The British Essayists: Guardian

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Page 223 - stretcheth out her hand to the poor; yea she reacheth forth her hands to the needy. " She is not afraid of the snow for her household, for all her household are clothed with scarlet. " She maketh herself coverings of tapestry, her clothing is silk and purple. • " Her husband is known in the gates, when he sitteth among the elders of
Page 223 - Strength and honour are her clothing, and she shall rejoice in time to come. " She openeth her mouth with wisdom, and in her tongue is the law of kindness. " She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness. " Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all.
Page 223 - Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her. " Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain, but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised.
Page 223 - layeth her hands to the spindle, and her hands hold the distaff". " She perceiveth that her merchandise is good ; her candle goeth not out by night. " She stretcheth out her hand to the poor; yea she reacheth forth her hands to the needy.
Page 35 - Should I not spare Nineveh that great city, wherein are more than sixscore thousand persons and also much cattle?' And we have in Deuteronomy a precept of great good-nature of this sort, with a blessing in form
Page 46 - life. Thus his supposed relief became his punishment, and like the damned in Milton, upon their conveyance at certain revolutions from fire to ice, He felt by turns the bitter change Of fierce extremes, extremes by change more fierce.
Page 44 - life of sloth receives daily strength from its continuance. ' I went," says Solomon, ' by the field of the slothful, and the vineyard of the man void of understanding ; and lo! it was all grown over with thorns, and nettles had covered the face thereof, and the stone wall thereof was broken down.' To raise the image of this person, the same author adds,
Page 156 - which, as I said, is only a simile ; whereas Virgil professes to treat of the nature of the horse. It is thus admirably translated : The fiery courser, when he hears from far The sprightly trumpets, and the shouts of war, Pricks up his ears, and trembling with delight, Shifts pace, and paws ; and hopes the promis'd
Page 261 - the sentiments of revealed religion. Heaven has but Our sorrow for our sins, and then delights To pardon erring man. Sweet mercy seems Its darling attribute, which limits justice ; As if there were degrees in infinite : And infinite would rather want perfection Than punish to extent ' I might shew several faults of the same nature in
Page 22 - own nation. Here will I hold. If there's a power above us, (And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works) He

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