The Geographical and Historical Dictionary of America and the West Indies: Containing an Entire Translation of the Spanish Work of Colonel Don Antonio de Alcedo, with Large Additions and Compilations from Modern Voyages and Travels and from Original and Authentic Information. In five volumes. Vol. I. [-V.].

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James Carpenter, ... Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, ... White, Cochrane and Company and Murray, ... London; Parker, Oxford; and Deighton, Cambridge., 1812 - America

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Juan Antonio de la Fuente. Improbable se trate de D. J.A.

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Page 423 - time. They have several kinds of dances, which are lively and pleasing, and possess considerable variety. The women are rarely permitted to dance with the men, but form their companies apart, and dance to the sound of the same instruments. If what the celebrated Leibnitz asserts is true, that men have never
Page 459 - of the village of Novita, employed his parishioners to dig a small canal in the ravine De la Raspadura, by means of which, when the rains are abundant, canoes loaded with cacao pass from sea to sea. This interior communication has existed since 1788, unknown in Europe. The small canal of
Page 204 - which they were returned into the vessel, which was filled with water, and once more boiled, being stirred the whole time. When this had been continued sufficiently long, the unstrained contents were poured into earthen jars of great size, which were buried up to the middle in the floor of the house ; these were closely
Page 244 - who are looked upon somewhat lik'e knights of Malta, or some distinguished» military order. They are brave, despise danger or death, and boast that they have never shed white man's blood. Besides these, there are of old men and strangers who live among them, nearly the same number, but there are
Page 515 - The present territory of Connecticut, at the time of the first arrival of the English, was possessed by the Pequot, the Mohegan, Podunk, and many other smaller tribes of Indians. In 1774, there were of the descendants of the ancient natives only 1363 persons ; the greater part of whom lived at Mohegan, between Norwich and New
Page 221 - to pursue his discoveries ; but his crew, who suffered equal hardships, without the same spirit to support them, mutinied, seized upon him and seven of those who were most faithful to him, and committed them to the fury of the icy seas in an open boat. Hudson and his
Page 290 - of pork, three bushels of pease, for the men's provision, two oil-cloths to cover the goods, a sail, &c. an axe, a towing-line, a kettle, and a sponge to bail out the water, with a quantity of gum, bark, and watape, to repair the vessel.
Page 143 - cannot be doubted. The capital of this island was scarce risen from the ashes to which it had been reduced by two dreadful fires, when it was torn from its foundations, and the whole country made a scene of desolation, by the storm of the 10th of October 1780, in which no less than
Page 322 - chief pride, it was an unequivocal proof of the sincerity of their sorrow, when, on the death of a relation or friend, they cut it short like their slaves and captives, to whom the privilege of wearing long hair was rigorously

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