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dies; that the benefits derived from this

commercialintercourse are not barely confined to a communication between Great, Britain, the West-Indies, and America, but that the different commodities imported from America add considerably to our commerce with the East-Country, Germany, Holland, France, Spain, Portugal, and the different Italian States. It states the return in bullion, &c., from those different countries, and the various advantages arising therefrom, particularly how this circuitous, intercourse encreases our seamen and shipping, and gives employment to our various manuactures. It next proceeds to shew the very great advantages we derived from our commerce with America till the year 1765, the period the effects of the Stampact were first felt in this country. It

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Sir William Meredith arose, and proposed an amendment, viz. “.. that the word THE be left out, and A inserted in its stead;” and that all the latter part of the motion be erased, which would leave it in the following manner: “That the petition might be referred to A com— mittee.” Sir William's opinion was, that the petition could not be referred to Thursday's committee, as that was a Ppointed to take, into consideration the American papers only; besides, said Sif William, the hearing the merchants. would greatly retard the business which was meant to be done for a reconciliation between the Mother-country and America, , . . . . . . . . . . : - - - Mr. Burke and Mr. Townsend replied to Sir William with great force of argu

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gentlemen on the other fide have happily drawn the line. The other petitions all relate to commerce, theirs is a committee of f colicy; since that is the case, sure this, which contains nothing else, not even a syllable, should be referred by way of contraditiinction to this very politic committee. I do therefore move, ihat said petition be referred to the committee solely designed for the investigation of political matters. His advice, however, was not followed ; it was confequently referred with the rest, after the usual amendment was proposed and agreed to. Sir George Saville then informed the house, that on his return towards home from the Milbourne select committee, a petition was put into his hand, referring to a paper referred to the committee appointed to take into confideration the itate papers to-morrow ; that it was signed by Mr. Bolland, Dr. Franklyn, and Dr. Lee ; and that it prayed to be heard in proof of the allegations contained in said paper. The paper, he said, was an address from the delegates of the several provinces of America, assembled in congress: He should therefore be glad to know in what mode the petitioners could be heard. Mr. Bamber Gascoigne insisted, that the petition could not be received, as it related to matters of which the house had not yet taken cognizance. Mr. Rigby was of the same opinion. He said, no Petition could be received touching the contents of a paper not yet known ; that when the paper was read, the house would be able to judge whether or not the matter it contained was such as the house would think proper to enter into the confideration of. Mr. Burke contended strongly, that the house could not, consistently with their usual mode of proceeding, refuse to receive the petition, nor when it was received, refuse to refer it. Mr. Sollicitor General said, that the whole conversation was irregular and unparliamentary, as there was no question before the house ; and, that till the contents of the paper were known, it was impossible to tell whether it would be proper to receive any proofs relative to the matters it set forth. Mr. Burke then proceeded to frame a question, grounded on the arguments of his opponents, in which the negative urged, that when a paper was referred to

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