Porcupine's Works: Containing Various Writings and Selections, Exhibiting a Faithful Picture of the United States of America; of Their Government, Laws, Politics and Resources; of the Characters of Their Presidents, Governors, Legislators, Magistrates, and Military Men; and of the Customs, Manners, Morals, Religion, Virtues and Vices of the People: Comprising Also a Complete Series of Historical Documents and Remarks, from the End of the War, in 1783, to the Election of the President, in March, 1801, Volume 8

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Cobbett and Morgan, 1801 - United States
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Page 63 - I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part And each particular hair to stand on end, Like quills upon the fretful porcupine : But this eternal blazon must not be To ears of flesh and blood.
Page 255 - It is agreed, that in all cases where vessels shall be captured or detained on just suspicion of having on board enemy's property, or of carrying to the enemy any of the articles which are contraband of war...
Page 256 - It is likewise agreed that the subjects and citizens of the two nations shall not do any acts of hostility or violence against each other, nor accept commissions or instructions so to act from any foreign Prince or State, enemies to the other party; nor shall the enemies of one of the parties be permitted to invite, or endeavour to enlist in their military service, any of the subjects or citizens of the other party; and the laws against all such offences and aggressions shall be punctually executed.
Page 255 - ... brought in for adjudication, and in the payment or recovery of any indemnification, adjudged or agreed to be paid to the masters or owners of such ships.
Page 251 - The Most Christian King and the United States engage mutually not to grant any particular favour to other nations, in respect of commerce and navigation, which shall not immediately become common to the other party, who shall enjoy the same favour, freely, if the concession was freely made, or on allowing the same compensation, if the concession was conditional.
Page 255 - ... shall be at liberty to proceed with the remainder without any impediment. And it is agreed that all proper measures shall be taken to prevent delay in deciding the cases of ships or cargoes so brought in for adjudication, and in the payment or recovery of any indemnification, adjudged or agreed to be pai-!
Page 240 - July, 1 796, merits the first attention. It announces that the conduct of France towards neutrals, will be regulated by the manner in which they should suffer the English to treat them. At Malaga and Cadiz, the French consuls have interpreted this decree, to authorize the capture and condemnation of American vessels for the single circumstance of their being destined to a British port. But its fullest effect has been produced in the West Indies...
Page 241 - Nivose, 5th year.) authorizing the capture and condemnation of all neutral vessels bound to certain enumerated ports, which, it is pretended in the decree, were delivered up to the English, and are occupied and defended by emigrants; and, also, of such vessels as should be cleared out generally for the West Indies.
Page 256 - ... the other party, and be taken by the other party, it is hereby declared to be lawful for the said party to treat and punish the said subject or citizen having such commission or letters of marque as a pirate.

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