Little home workers: a reading book for first and second grades

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B.H. Sanborn & Co., 1911 - Readers (Elementary) - 138 pages
 

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Page 80 - The swallow is a mason. And underneath the eaves He builds a nest and plasters it With mud, and hay, and leaves. Of all the weavers that I know, The oriole is the best; High on the branches of the tree She hangs her cozy nest.
Page 73 - A THOUGHT IT is very nice to think The world is full of meat and drink, With little children saying grace In every Christian kind of place.
Page 60 - I've run away from a little old woman, A little old man, A barn full of threshers, A field full of mowers, A cow And I can run away from you, I can!
Page 80 - HE swallow is a mason, And underneath the eaves He builds a nest, and plasters it With mud, and hay, and leaves. The woodpecker is hard at work, A carpenter is he; And you may find him hammering His house high up a tree. The bullfinch knows and practises The basketmaker's trade: See what a cradle for his young The little thing has made!
Page 58 - I have run away from a little old woman, "And a little old man, "And I can run away from you, I can!" And, as the cow chased him, he looked over his shoulder and cried, — "Run! run! as fast as you can! "You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!
Page 57 - Run! run! as fast as you can! You can't catch me, I'm the Gingerbread Man!" And they could not catch him. The little Gingerbread Boy ran on and on. Soon he came to a cow. "Stop, little Gingerbread Boy," said the cow; "I should like to eat you.
Page 103 - ... all ablaze; • Three or four flowers at once outburst In the early sun's low, golden rays — And you were down at the doorstep first— And what magnificence met our sight! What a heavenly time we had, we two, Just adoring it, lost in delight! For the gray-green leaves were spangled with dew, And the flowers, like banners of silken flame Unfurled, stood each on its slender stem, While the soft breeze over them went and came, Lightly and tenderly rocking them.
Page v - A part of their schoolroom is fixed up for a dining-room, and for a few weeks the children play at preparing and serving meals, much as they do in many kindergartens, and, as in the kindergarten, lessons in cleanliness and table manners, language and...
Page 63 - The Gingerbread Man jumped upon his nose. The fox threw back his head and gave a snap. "Dear me!

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