An Abridgment of Bishop Burnet's History of His Own Times

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Page ii - WILL BE PLEASED TO SEND FREELY TO ALL APPLICANTS A LIST OF THE PUBLISHED AND PROJECTED VOLUMES TO BE COMPRISED UNDER THE FOLLOWING TWELVE HEADINGS: TRAVEL ^ SCIENCE ? FICTION THEOLOGY & PHILOSOPHY HISTORY ^ CLASSICAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE ESSAYS ^ ORATORY POETRY & DRAMA BIOGRAPHY ROMANCE IN TWO STYLES OF BINDING, CLOTH, FLAT BACK, COLOURED TOP, AND LEATHER, ROUND CORNERS, GILT TOP.
Page 209 - When any are to be struck in the boots, it is done in the presence of the council ; and upon that occasion almost all offer to run away. The sight is so dreadful, that, without an order restraining such a number to stay, the board would be forsaken. But the duke, while he had been in Scotland, was so far from withdrawing, that he looked on all the while with an unmoved indifference, and with an attention, as if he had been to look on some curious experiment. This gave a terrible idea of him to all...
Page 360 - He burst out into tears, and cried out that there was no hope of the queen, and that, from being the happiest, he was now going to be the miserablest creature upon earth. He said, during the whole course of their marriage he had never known one single fault in her ; there was a worth in her that nobody knew besides himself, though he added that I might know as much of her as any other person did.
Page 28 - So having used the priest civilly, he sent him back, being satisfied that he was in his power. This conduct so much pleased Cromwell, that he read the letter in council with great satisfaction, and said, " he hoped to make the name of an Englishman as great as ever that of a Roman had been.
Page 90 - Farewell, sun, moon, and stars ; farewell, world and time ; farewell, weak and frail body : welcome, eternity ; welcome, angels and saints ; welcome, Saviour of the world ; and welcome, God, the judge of all...
Page 46 - ... unnecessary shows of learning, and applied themselves to the matter, in which they opened the nature and reasons of things so fully, and with that simplicity, that their hearers felt an instruction of another sort than had commonly been observed before. So they became very much followed; and a set of these men brought off the city, in a great measure, from the prejudices they had formerly to the Church.
Page 47 - Lauderdale, afterwards made duke, had been for many years a zealous covenanter: but in the year forty-seven he turned to the king's interests ; and had continued a prisoner all the while after Worcester fight, where he was taken. He was kept for some years in the tower of London, in Portland castle, and in other prisons, till he was set at liberty by those who called home the king. So he went...
Page 129 - And he had the dexterity of insinuating himself so entirely into the greatest degree of confidence with three succeeding princes, who set up on very different interests, that he came by this to lose himself so much, that even those, who esteemed his parts, depended little on his firmness.
Page 194 - Burnet, who knew Sidney personally, gives the following character of him : " He was a man of most extraordinary courage ; a steady man, even to obstinacy; sincere, but of a rough and boisterous temper, that could not bear contradiction. He seemed to be a Christian, but in a particular form of his own : he thought it was to be like a divine philosophy in the mind; but he was against all public worship, and every thing that looked like a church.
Page 160 - ... a man more valued for a good readiness in (speaking well, than either for learning in his profession, or for (any moral virtue. His life had been indecently scandalous, and his fortunes were very low. He was raised by the earl of Danby's favour, first to be a judge, and then to be chief justice ; and it was a melancholy thing to see so bad, so ignorant, and so poor a man, raised up to that great post.

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