Fragments from the Past: 1832-1907

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Privately printed at the Chiswick Press, 1907 - Mapledurham (England) - 235 pages

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Page 227 - Quick, thy tablets, Memory!" Ah, too true! Time's current strong Leaves us fixt to nothing long. Yet, if little stays with man, Ah, retain we all we can ! If the clear impression dies, Ah, the dim remembrance prize! Ere the parting hour go by, Quick, thy tablets, Memory!
Page 235 - O lieb, so lang' du lieben kannst ! O lieb, so lang' du lieben magst! Die Stunde kommt, die Stunde kommt, wo du an Gräbern stehst und klagst...
Page 234 - We've got two bosses in our carriage now. The Magazine goes on increasing, and how much do you think my next twelve months' earnings and receipts will be if I work ? £10,000.
Page 134 - We thus find that the Darwinian theory, even when carried out to its extreme logical conclusion, not only does not oppose, but lends a decided support to, a belief in the spiritual nature of man. It shows us how man's body may have been developed from that of a lower animal form under the law of natural selection ; but it also teaches us that we possess intellectual and moral faculties which could not have been so developed, but must have had another origin ; and for this origin we can only find...
Page 207 - TERMINUS It is time to be old, To take in sail: — The god of bounds, Who sets to seas a shore, Came to me in his fatal rounds, And said: "No more!
Page 215 - WILL my tiny spark of being wholly vanish in your deeps and heights? Must my day be dark by reason, O ye Heavens, of your boundless nights, Rush of Suns, and roll of systems, and your fiery clash of meteorites?
Page 134 - It shows us how man's body may have been developed from that of a lower animal form under the law of natural selection ; but it also teaches us that we possess intellectual and moral faculties which could not have been so developed, but must have had another origin ; and for this origin we can only find an adequate cause in the unseen universe of Spirit INDEX ABBOTT, Dr.
Page 234 - March xoth, 1863, on the occasion of the wedding of the Prince of Wales, I saw him, I think, for the last time. It was on the platform of the Great Western Railway station at Windsor as the crowd of visitors, with their diamonds and court-dresses, looking somewhat ghastly in the broad daylight, was returning by special train to London. He seemed amused at the scene, and pointed out to me several personages of note. On Christmas Eve of that year he died suddenly in the night, in his fifty-third year.
Page 230 - This was when he was lying in bed, in one of his attacks of illness. On these delightful visits he would spare no pains in taking me to places of amusement — the play, or the pantomime — sometimes after an excellent dinner at the Garrick Club, where I remember his checking some one in the act of blurting out an oath, the utterance of which he would not tolerate in my presence.
Page 94 - Occasions cannot make Spurs. If you expect to wear Spurs you must win them. If you wish to use them you must buckle them to your own heels before you go into the Fight.

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