Beyond Superstructuralism: The Syntagmatic Side of Language

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Taylor & Francis US, 1993 - Philosophy - 259 pages
Moving on from his previous book, Superstructuralism , Richard Harland argues that the focus on single words in the structuralist theory of language is its key weakness and that the next advance beyond post-structuralism depends upon replacing word-based with syntagm-based theories. In a lucid way he develops a new syntagmatic theory which shows that the effect of combining words grammatically can transform the very nature of meaning. The wide breadth of coverage in the book covers both post-Chomskyan' linguistics and Derrida, and sets up an opposition to analytic and speech-act views of language. By presenting a systematic critique and counter-proposal, Harland challenges the very foundation of recent literary and language based theory.
 

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Contents

The limits of Superstructuralism
3
How words work together
13
Saussure and Derrida revisited
24
On the larger scale
36
Parts of wholes
46
The place of syntagmatic theory
57
The Phenomenological connection
67
The case against Logical Analytical philosophy
84
The natural grammar approach to syntax
134
The Generative approach to semantics
147
Syntagmatic theory and literature
169
Binarypolarization technique
195
The art of deconstruction
211
Conclusion
225
Bibliography
244
Index
254

The case against OrdinaryLanguage Analytical philosophy
102
The Generative approach to syntax
121

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