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KNOWLEDGE,

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IN TWENTY THREE VOLUMES.

VOLUME XXI.

PERTH:

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ENCYCLOPÆDIA PERTHENSIS.

s i N

STMSON, Professor, a younger brother of liie learned Dr R. Simson, with a memr.ir of »-h«n we concluded our last volume. This gentleman mi professor of medicine in the miivcrtityof St Andrews, an 1 is famed fi>r some works of reputatvxi; particularly a Dissertation on the Nfvous Sri.TM, occasioned by the Dissection of a Brain cofTplelelv Ossified.

• • SIMULAR. n.f. [from simu/o, Latin.] One that counterfeits.—

Thou perjurer, thou simular of virtue, That art incestuous. Shak.

• SIMULATION, n.f. [simulation, French; tinralatio, from simu>o, Latin.] That part of hypocrisy which pretends that to be which is not.— Si-ra.'^tioa is a vice rising of a natural falseness, or fcarfubese; because a man must needs disguise, it maketh him practise simulation. Bnton.—He well expressed his love in an act and time of no simulation towards his end, bequeathing her all his manfion-houses. H'ottcn.—Deeeivirg by actions, gestures, or behavour, is called simulation or hypocrisv. South.

SIMULTANEOUS, adj. [ stmultaneus, Lit.] Acting together r existing at the farm rime.—Why may not bullets, closely crowded in a 1h>x, move bv a like niutu il and simultaneous excharg* ! G/anvilie.

SIMULUS, an ancient Latin poet,' who wrote a poem on the Tarpeian rj.'i. Pint, in Rom. SIMifRA, an ancient town of Phœ icia. (t.) * SIN. n.f. \fyn, Saxon ] i. An act against the laws of God ; a violation of the laws of religion.—

It is great sin to swear unto a sin, But greater sin to keep a sinful oath. Shak.

Beirg a divine, a ghostly confessor, A sin absolver. Shak. But those that sleep, and think not on their sins,

Pinch them. . .Shak.

Vol. XXI. Part 2.

S I N

—I am pure from all sin with n'an. Toit Hi. 14. l. Habitual nei'ligence of religion.—Sin, death, and hell, have set their mark« upon him. Shak. i';'/; bred! how have ye troubled all mankind i

Milton.

The sank vapours of the sin-worn mould.

■ •. Mil/an. Is there no means, but that a jm-fick land Should be let blood with such a boilt'rouK hand?

. . Daniel. —Virc or virtue chiefly imply the relation of our actions to men ; sin arii holiness imply their relation to God. H'atts.

Each affection of this j/»-worn globe. Brooke. 3. It is used by Shakspeare dn\i\izx.icjX\y for a man cnoimoully wicked.—

Thy .1'mliitinn, Thou scarlet sin, lObb'd this bewailing land Of noble iiucki"gham. Shak. (;.) Sin. See Thf.ologv. {%.) Sin, the rame of orre of the cMef Japanese Deities, :n fheif ancient Sintoo Religion.

(4.) Sin, i:i geography, or Jijrbc-Sin, a kingdom of Africa, in Senegtl, extending about Ji miles along the coast, and abounding in rice, fiuite, cotton, maize, &c. seal is the capital.

* To Sin. *. n. [tiom the nonir.] r. To neglect the laws of religion ; to vi« late the laws of religion.—^tand in awe .and sin not. Psalm iv. 4. —Many also have sinn'A for women. Efdr.—He shall give l.im life for them that sin not unto death. 1 John, v. 16. a. To offend against right. I am a man, More sinn'A against than sinning. Shak.

And who but wiflies to invert the laws Of order, sinj against th' eternal cause. Pope. S1NA. See Sinai.

SINiK, at: ancient people of Indi.i, reckoned, by Ptolemy the (host eastern nation in the world.

SINAI, or Sin A, a famous mountain of Arabia Petiaa, uoon which God gave the law to Moses.

A It

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