Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Volume 2

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A. Strahan, and T. Cadell, 1814 - Logic
 

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Page 17 - Tis with our judgments as our watches, none Go just alike, yet each believes his own.
Page 7 - There wanted yet the master work, the end Of all yet done ; a creature who, not prone And brute as other creatures, but endued With sanctity of reason, might erect His stature, and upright with front serene Govern the rest, self-knowing, and from thence 510 Magnanimous to correspond with Heaven...
Page 95 - For if we will reflect on our own ways of thinking, we shall find, that sometimes the mind perceives the agreement or disagreement of two ideas immediately by themselves, without the intervention of any other : and this I think we may call intuitive knowledge.
Page 73 - Here then I find myself absolutely and necessarily determined to live and talk and act like other people in the common affairs of life.
Page 395 - small particles of bodies certain powers, virtues, or forces, by which they act at a " distance, not only upon the rays of light for reflecting, refracting, and inflecting them, " but also upon one another, for producing a great part of the phenomena of nature?
Page 462 - Nature had not placed so many valves without design ; and no design seemed more probable, than that, since the blood could not well, because of the interposing valves, be sent by the veins to the limbs, it should be sent through the arteries, and return through the veins, whose valves did not oppose its course that way."* 284.
Page 367 - As in mathematics, so in natural philosophy, the investigation of difficult things by the method of analysis, ought ever to precede the method of composition. This analysis consists in making experiments and observations, and in drawing general conclusions from them by induction, and admitting of no objections against the conclusions, but such as are taken from experiments, or other certain truths.
Page 8 - Revelation is natural reason enlarged by a new set of discoveries communicated by God immediately, which reason vouches the truth of, by the testimony and proofs it gives, that they come from God. So that he that takes away reason, to make way for revelation, puts out the light of both, and does much the same, as if he would persuade a man to put out his eyes, the better to receive the remote light of an invisible star by a telescope.
Page 227 - He had another particularity, of which none of his friends ever ventured to ask an explanation. It appeared to me some superstitious habit which he had contracted early, and from which he had never called upon his reason to disentangle him. This was his anxious care to go out or in at a door or passage, by a certain number of steps from a certain point, or at least so...
Page 8 - Reason is natural revelation, whereby the eternal Father of light, and Fountain of all knowledge, communicates to mankind that portion of truth which he has laid within the reach of their natural faculties.

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