Bishop Burnet's history of his own time: from the restoration of Charles II to the treaty of peace at Utrecht, in the reign of Queen Anne

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W. Smith, 1850 - History - 949 pages
 

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Contents

The English nation inflamed at
57
The chief ministers of the party ib A new parliament
58
X
66
The meetings of the presbyterians 93 The constitution of a national synod
79
Scruples about the oath of supremacy 95 1664
102
The Dutch
109
The plaguo broke out at the same
121
Hisi
139
1666
154
A new scheme of government ib Some change their religion
156
1667
161
An act for abjuring
166
The Irish sought the protection of France
170
1702
235
The character of Halewyn 219 I was disgraced
247
Driven back by a sudden thaw ib Sir Harbottle Grimstoncs character
253
The kings illness and fall from his horse
254
A further indulgence 226
260
His character
265
Debates in the House of Lords ib The affairs of Scotland
266
Lauderdales design 286 The Prince of Orange came into England
272
A dispute raised about tho lords of the articles ib An army of Highlanders sent to the west upon
278
Affairs in Scotland 630 Affairs in Holstein
302
Qvy r s Annk succeeds
312
Coleman and his papers seized 283 Duchess of Portsmouths conduct in this matter
322
A law passed for the tost to be taken by both Houses 289 A new expedient of a prince regent
328
Scroggs was then lord ehief justice 297 Practices upon witnesses
335
Debates concerning the exclusion 303 Objections made to the test
341
Langhorns trial 309 Affairs in England 316
347
The many false stories spread to raise jealousy 315 Monmouth and Russel at Shepherds
353
An alliance projected against France ib The Earl of Essex was sent to the Tower
360
An association proposed 321 Prince George of Denmark married the Princess
366
The kings course of life
427
The persons who were chiefly engaged in this 430 Albevilles memorial to the States
461
A zeal appeared there against popery 434 Which the clergy were ordered to read
467
The state and temper I observed among the re To the great joy of the town and nation
473
The prince in treaty with the Earl of Tyrconnel 511 Debates for and against an abjuration of King
550
The oaths were altered 522 The French masters of the sea
556
The judges well chosen 527 Affairs abroad 5i2
563
Was at last raised 536 Many promotions in the church
570
Affairs in Scotland
575
Bridgman made lord keeper
588
A treaty for a comprehension of the prcsbytcrians
596
The committee of Brook House
607
Tho affair of Glencoo 576 The proceedings in parliament
608
Affairs in Germany 582 The death of some lords
614
Affairs in Flanders ib The state of the coin rectified
620
A bank erected 599 King James was not acquitted by them
626
Few refused the abjuration oath
662
The earl of Sunderland retired from business ib An address to the king about
687
1669
691
The war with France proclaimed
705
Many parliament men gained by the court
709
Affairs in Scotland
711
He marches to the Danube 752 The danger of the church inquired into
754
The Duke of Marlborough advanced to Tiiora 755 1706
786
Debatea about the succession 762 The Germans are defeated in Italy
793
King Philip went to Italy
798
The end of the parliament 770 Debated long iu the parliament of Scotland
799
Who failed him ib The supplies were granted
805
They landed near Barcelona ib The siege of Lcrida
811
An insurrection in the Cevennes
818
Some new peers made
867
A representation of the lower house 867 An indignation in both houses at the French pro
886
His motion agreed to by the Lords in their address France
892
A bill for a regency on the queens death 782
898
179
932
713
938
202
940
781
944
219
948

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Page 34 - A man so various that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts and nothing long ; But in the course of one revolving moon Was chymist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking.
Page 62 - she was a woman of great beauty, but most enormously vicious and ravenous ; foolish, but imperious; very uneasy to the king, and always carrying on intrigues with other men, while yet she pretended she was jealous of him.
Page 34 - ... In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-huiig The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung. On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red. Great Villiers lies — alas, how chang'd from him That life of pleasure, and that soul of whim .' Gallant and gay, in Cliveden's proud alcove, The bower of wanton Shrewsbury and Love Or juit a* gay, at council, in a ring...
Page 381 - He used often to say, that, if he were to choose a place to die in, it should be an inn : it looking like a pilgrim's going home, to whom this world was all as an inn, and who was weary of the noise and confusion in it.
Page 471 - ... the beginning of your Majesty's reign ; and is a matter of so great moment and consequence to the whole nation, both in church and state, that your petitioners cannot in prudence, honour, or conscience so far make themselves parties to it, as the distribution of it all over the nation, and the solemn publication of it once and again, even in God's house and in the time of his divine service, must amount to .in common and reasonable construction.
Page 34 - He laughed himself from court; then sought relief By forming parties, but could ne'er be chief : For, spite of him, the weight of business fell On Absalom and wise Achitophel: Thus, wicked but in will, of means bereft, He left not faction, but of that was left.
Page 197 - We were indeed amazed to see a poor commonalty so capable to argue upon points of government, and on the bounds to be set to the power of princes in matters of religion : upon all these topics they had texts of scripture at hand ; and were ready with their answers to any thing that was said to them. This measure of knowledge was spread even among the meanest of them, their cottagers, and their servants.
Page 160 - Farewell, sun, moon, and stars ; farewell, world and time ; farewell, weak and frail body : welcome, eternity ; welcome, angels and saints ; welcome, Saviour of the world ; and welcome, God, the judge of all...
Page 160 - So he was put to the torture, which in Scotland they call the boots; for they put a pair of iron boots close on the leg, and drive wedges between these and the leg. The common torture was only to drive these in the calf of the leg: but I have been told they were sometimes driven upon the shin bone.
Page 36 - White, did come seasonably in, and at the push of pike did repel the stoutest regiment the enemy had there, merely with the courage the Lord was pleased to give. Which proved a great amazement to the residue of their foot, this being the first action between the foot.

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