The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine, Volume 2

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Houlston and Stonemen, 1865
 

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Page 434 - tis He alone Decidedly can try us, He knows each chord — its various tone, Each spring — its various bias : Then at the balance let's be mute, We never can adjust it; What's done we partly may compute, But know not what's resisted.
Page 210 - AH ! who can tell how hard it is to climb The steep where Fame's proud temple shines afar; Ah! who can tell how many a soul sublime Has felt the influence of malignant star, And waged with Fortune an eternal war...
Page 119 - Beside yon straggling fence that skirts the way, With blossom'd furze unprofitably gay, There, in his noisy mansion, skilled to rule, The village master taught his little school. A man severe he was, and stern to view ; I knew him well, and every truant knew : Well had the boding tremblers learned to trace The day's disasters in his morning face...
Page 123 - Thus with the year Seasons return, but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine; But cloud instead, and ever-during dark Surrounds me...
Page 238 - True ease in writing comes from art, not chance ; As those move easiest who have learned to dance. 'Tis not enough no harshness gives offence, The sound must seem an echo to the sense : Soft is the strain when zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse rough verse should like the torrent roar.
Page 236 - In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold; Alike fantastic, if too new, or old: Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
Page 235 - ... twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure. Now, this overdone, or come tardy off, though it make the unskilful laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve ; the censure of which one must in your allowance o'erweigh a whole theatre of others.
Page 95 - THE Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave unto him, to show unto his servants things which must shortly come to pass...
Page 398 - Muse must flatter lawless sway, And follow still where fortune leads the way ; Or if no basis bear my rising name, But the fallen ruins of another's fame ; Then teach me, Heaven ! to scorn the guilty bays; Drive from my breast that wretched lust of praise ; Unblemish'd let me live or die unknown ; Oh, grant an honest fame, or grant me none !
Page 237 - While expletives their feeble aid do join, And ten low words oft creep in one dull line: While they ring round the same unvaried chimes, With sure returns of still expected rhymes ; Where'er you find ' the cooling western breeze...

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