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and 24). And although the Hebrew term here used, is not exactly the same as the expression “ seven times” in the later prophets; yet, since constructing the larger chart of this work, I have observed that it is thus considered as a chronological term by one of the speakers in the

Dialogues on Prophecy;" and likewise by a writer in one of the Periodical Magazines: and I consider, from the peculiarity of its phraseology, and standing in this remarkable position, that, although a more obscure term is here used than was subsequently employed, yet notwithstanding it has a direct reference to a determined period.

It was the opinion of the celebrated Mede, who wrote on this subject above two hundred years ago, and whose name is increasing in reputation in the estimation of “students of prophecy,” that the three times and a half of Daniel and St. John was but the bisection of a complete number of seven times, which he called the sacred calendar, or the great almanack of prophecy, and to which he thought “all mention of times in the Scripture had reference.” He also recognises the captivity of Israel under the four successive Gentile monarchies, as forming this complete period, or great calendar of prophecy; reasoning on the subject à priori, without any reference, that I know of, to any distinct prophecy on the subject. The learned Mr. Faber also recognises this principle,

and assumes as a datum the mention of “ seven times” in Nebuchadnezzar's dream of the great tree, which he justly considers to mark the period of the duration of the four tyrannical monarchies, giving his work the title of “The Sacred Calendar of Prophecy.” By Rev. Mr. Digby, Mr. J. A. Brown author of the “ Eventide,” as well as by other writers, the great period of " three times and a half” is also considered but as an incomplete period --the half of “ seven times;”—and all who have thus noticed it, have also considered the complete period to refer either to the duration of Israel's captivity, or to the duration of the Gentile monarchies. As will be perceived, by referring to the head or beginning of this "Period,” I consider it has not one only, but two applications; and alludes in this, its two-fold application, to both these great events; the one, to the house or kingdom of Israel, and the other to the kingdom of Judah.

As a period under the designation of “seven times” thus appears to be recognised, comprising an almanack or calendar in which other chronological predictions are involved-recognised indeed, like some great discoveries in science, rather by induction than by actual demonstration-I will now proceed to give those reasons which have induced me to consider the oftenrepeated mention of the term in Léviticus xxvi.,

and 24). And although the Hebrew term here used, is not exactly the same as the expression “seven times ” in the later prophets; yet, since constructing the larger chart of this work, I have observed that it is thus considered as a chronological term by one of the speakers in the

Dialogues on Prophecy;" and likewise by a writer in one of the Periodical Magazines: and I consider, from the peculiarity of its phraseology, and standing in this remarkable position, that, although a more obscure term is here used than was subsequently employed, yet notwithstanding it has a direct reference to a determined period.

It was the opinion of the celebrated Mede, who wrote on this subject above two hundred years ago, and whose name is increasing in reputation in the estimation of “students of prophecy,” that the three times and a half of Daniel and St. John was but the bisection of a complete number of seven times, which he called the sacred calendar, or the great almanack of prophecy, and to which he thought "all mention of times in the Scripture had reference.” He also recognises the captivity of Israel under the four successive Gentile monarchies, as forming this complete period, or great calendar of prophecy; reasoning on the subject à priori, without any reference, that I know of, to any distinct prophecy on the subject. The learned Mr. Faber also recognises this principle,

and assumes as a datum the mention of “ seven timesin Nebuchadnezzar's dream of the great tree, which he justly considers to mark the period of the duration of the four tyrannical monarchies, giving his work the title of “The Sacred Calendar of Prophecy.” By Rev. Mr. Digby, Mr.J. A. Brown author of the “ Eventide,” as well as by other writers, the great period of “ three times and a half” is also considered but as an incomplete period—the half of “seven times;”—and all who have thus noticed it, have also considered the complete period to refer either to the duration of Israel's captivity, or to the duration of the Gentile monarchies. As will be perceived, by referring to the head or beginning of this “Period,” I consider it has not one only, but two applications; and alludes in this, its two-fold application, to both these great events; the one, to the house or kingdom of Israel, and the other to the kingdom of Judah.

As a period under the designation of “seven times” thus appears to be recognised, comprising an almanack or calendar in which other chronological predictions are involved-recognised indeed, like some great discoveries in science, rather by induction than by actual demonstration-I will now proceed to give those reasons which have induced me to consider the oftenrepeated mention of the term in Leviticus xxvi.,

of Israel ; which alliance to destroy the house of David is noticed at length under the Second Period. From this circumstance it would appear that Ahaz, who was a wicked king, was not satisfied with the assurance of deliverance given him by the prophet Isaiah, but he must call in human help; for it is said that“Ahaz sent messengers to Tiglath-Pileser king of Assyria, saying, I am thy servant and thy son: come up, and save me out of the hand of the king of Syria, and out of the hand of the king of Israel, which rise up against me. And Ahaz took the silver and gold that was found in the house of the Lord, and in the treasures of the king's house, and sent it for a present to the king of Assyria. And the king of Assyria hearkened unto him: for the king of Assyria went up against Damascus, and took it, and carried the people of it captive to Kir, and slew Rezin” (2 Kings xvi. 7-9).

This fatal step was the herald of Israel's destruction : it gave an introduction to that formidable power, that terrible “lion from the north,” which ultimately swept desolation and ruin over all the land-it was inviting a serpent that was to sting them to death. It was the first appearance of the “head of gold.” It appears, that, after taking Damascus from the king of Syria, the king of Assyria took from the king of Israel “Ijon, and Abel-beth-maachah,

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