Customs and Excise: Trade, Production, and Consumption in England, 1640-1845

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Oxford University Press, 2003 - Business & Economics - 396 pages
This book traces the growth of customs and excise, and their integral role in shaping the framework of industrial England; including state power, technical advance, and the evolution of a consumer society. Central to this structure was the development of two economies - one legal and one illicit. If there was a unique English pathway of industrialization, it was less a distinct entrepreneurial and techno-centric culture, than one predominantly defined within an institutional framework spearheaded by the excise and a wall of tariffs. This process reached its peak by the end of the 1770s. The structure then quickly started to crumble under the weight of the fiscal-military state, and Pitt's calculated policy of concentrating industrial policy around cotton, potteries, and iron - at the expense of other taxed industries. The breakthrough of the new political economy was the erosion of the illicit economy; the smugglers' free trade now became the state's most powerful weapon in the war against non-legal trade. If at the beginning of the period covered by this book state administration was predominantly deregulated and industry regulated, by the close the reverse was the case.
 

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Contents

The Emergence of Public Credit War Revenue and High Politics 16431721
15
The Consumptibility of Goods Customs Excise and Trade
35
The Equitable Tax?
53
Liberty Property and the Excise
63
The Devils Remedy
85
Delusion? Trust Credit and the Excise
87
The Introduction of the Excise
94
His leering eyes gives such a look The World of Excise
117
Drink and Food
209
Candles Salt Soap Starch Leather Paper Textiles and Glass
235
Ye Judgement of the Gaugers Shaping and Regulating the Market
259
Measurement Instrumentation and Alcohol Standards
261
Revenue Metrology and Casks
280
The Incarceration Adulteration and Policing of Taxed Goods
299
Dismantling the FiscalMilitary State
317
The Limits of Taxation and the Politics of Representation
319

An Impolite and Commercial People The Common Economy
131
Life on the Waterfront
133
Pilfering Customs Fees and Remuneration
154
Smuggling
165
Free Trade Transport and Concealment
184
Going on the Gauge Excise Fraud and Production
207
Revenue Old Corruption and Manufacturing Interests
341
Simplicity Uniformity and Perspicuity
358
The Calico Millennium
379
Index
384
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

William J. Ashworth is a Lecturer in History, University of Liverpool.

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