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Obtains his Fellowship, vi. 674.

Publishes the second volume of Musa Anglicanæ, containing
bis own Latin Poems.

Obtains a travelling grant of £200 from King William, vi. 636, 675.
Leaves Oxford and sets out on his travels, i. 358.

At Paris, writes to Lord Somers, Montagu, and Frowde, v. 322-3.
At Blois, where he stays till July, 1760, studying the French
language, v. 331.

At Lyons, writes to Bishop Hough, v. 382.
Leaves Marseilles for Italy, i. 358.

In Italy, writes to the Earl of Manchester and Lord Halifax,
v. 334.

At Rome, v. 335.

At Geneva, having composed his "Letter to Lord Halifax"
while travelling over the Alps, v. 336.

30 Dates the original draft of his "Letter to Lord Halifax" from

Italy, vi. 537.

-

33

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At Hamburgh, v. 338-340.

Death of Addison's father, v. 430, vi. 672.

In Holland, at the Hague, Leyden, Amsterdam, v. 339–345.

In correspondence with the Duke of Somerset, about becoming

Tutor to his son, v. 340-343.

Elected Member of the Kit-cat Club immediately after his return
home.

Engaged in writing his celebrated Poem "the Campaign," on
the Victory of Blenheim, (gained Aug. 13, 1704,) i. 42, vi. 683.
Appointed Commissioner of Appeals, in place of the celebrated
Locke, v. 420.

In London, publishes his Travels, v. 347.

Writes Prologue to Steele's Tender Husband, i. 81.

Goes to Hanover with Lord Halifax, v. 348.

Appointed Under-Secretary of State, first to Sir Charles Hedges,
afterwards (in December) to the Earl of Sunderland, vi. 745.
At the Duke of Marlborough's camp at Helchin near the Hague,
v. 348.

xiv

ADDISONIAN CHRONOLOGY.

YR.

MONTH. AGE.

1706 Dec. 8 34

1707 March 4 35 Nov.

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Lord Sunderland appointed Secretary of State, to whom Addison becomes Under-Secretary, v. 353-4.

His Rosamond acted (run only three nights).

Publishes "Present State of the War," iv. 340.

36 Returned M. P. for Lostwithiel, but "not duly elected," v. 425. Writes Letters from Sandy-End (near Fulham) to Earl of War. wick, v. 386-7.

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1714 April 16 42
May 4
June 18

August
Sep. 17
Sep. 29

Dec.

Loses his appointment as Under-Secretary, upon Lord Sunder-
land's retirement.

Appointed Chief Secretary to the Marquis of Wharton, Lord-
Lieutenant of Ireland, v. 374.

Salary as Keeper of the Irish Records raised to £400 per annum,
vi. 632, 745.

Tatler commenced by Steele, vi. 687.

In Ireland. Returned M. P. for Cavan, May 13th.

Speaks in Irish Parliament, August 10th, &c., v. 377-9, vi. 716.
In London, v. 379-80.

In London, v. 382.

In Dublin, v. 383-386, 391-2, vi. 726.

In London, v. 393.

Publishes the First Number of Whig-Examiner, iv. 370.
Returned M. P. for Malmesbury, v. 425.

In London, v. 396, 404.

Steele's last Tatler published, vi. 688.
Commences Spectator.

Loses his place, £2000 per annum, an estate in the Indies worth
£14,000, and his Mistress. See letter, v. 401.

Writes Epilogue to Phillips' "Distressed Mother," v. 228.
First Number of Guardian published by Steele.
Cato rehearsed.

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Assigns vol. viii. of Spectator to Tonson, vi. 631.
Publishes revised edition of his Musa Anglicane.

Secretary to the Lords Justices and the Regency.

Arrival of George I. from Hanover, (Pub. Entry, 20th,) v. 418-421. Secretary to the Earl of Sunderland (having discharged office of Secretary to the Regency).

Returned M. P. for Malmesbury for the 3rd time (Jan. 1715). 1715 Ma. Ju. 43 Engaged in reporting Political News to Earl Sunderland

Oct. 4

Dec.
Dec, 25

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Salary as Keeper of the Irish Records raised to £500, vi. 637.
Appointed a Lord of Trade and Plantations, vice Arch. Hatcham.
Publishes Freeholder, No. I., iv. 396.

The Drummer performed (ran only three nights).
Married to the Countess of Warwick, v. 434.

Sunderland resigns Viceroyalty of Ireland. Addison loses secre-
taryship, v. 434.

Spends honeymoon in Paris, vi. 744.

Writes Defence of the Christian Religion, v. 103.

Appointed Secretary of State with £1850 per annum, (Gazetted
April 16,) v. 436, vi. 639,

Grant of £3000 Secret Service Money, vi. 640.
Confined to his room with sickness, vi. 510.
Resigns the Seals, vi. 509.

Retiring Pension £1600 per annum, vi. 641.
Patent Fee £100 per annum, vi. 640.
Grant of Silver Plate, 1013 ounces, vi. 642.
Publishes his "Old Whig," No. 1, in reply to Steele.
Ditto, No. 2.

Makes his will, vi. 525.

Bequeaths his literary property to Craggs, vi. 523.
Dies in his 47th year at Hund House, vi. 523.

INSCRIPTION TO MR. ADDISON,

WRITTEN IN 1805.

EXIMIO VIRO,

JOSEPHO ADDISON:

GRATIA, FAMA, FORTUNA COMMENDATO;
HUMANIORIBUS LITERIS UNICE INSTRUCTO
HAUD IGNOBILI POETÆ;
IN ORATIONE SOLUTA CONTEXENDA

SUMMO ARTIFICI;

CENSORI MORUM

GRAVI SANÉ, SED ET PERJUCUNDO.

LEVIORIBUS IN ARGUMENTIS

SUBRIDENTI SUAVITER.

RES ETIAM SERIAS

LEPORE QUODAM SUO CONTINGENTI;
PIETATIS, PORRÒ, SINCERE,

HOC EST, CHRISTIANÆ,

FIDE, VITA, SCRIPTIS

STUDIOSISSIMO CULTORI:

EXIMIO, PROINDĖ, viro,

JOSEPHO ADDISON,

HOC MONUMENTUM SACRUM ESTO.

R. W. 1805, Sept. 5.

b

TO THE

RIGHT HONOURABLE JAMES CRAGGS, ESQ.

HIS MAJESTY'S PRINCIPAL SECRETARY OF STATE

DEAR SIR,

I CANNOT wish that any of my writings should last longer than the memory of our friendship, and therefore I thus publicly bequeath them to you, in return for the many valuable instances of your affection.

That they may come to you with as little disadvantage as pos sible, I have left the care of them to one, whom, by the experience of some years, I know well qualified to answer my intentions He has already the honour and happiness of being under your protection; and, as he will very much stand in need of it, I cannot wish him better, than that he may continue to deserve the favour and countenance of such a patron.

I have no time to lay out in forming such compliments, as would but ill suit that familiarity between us, which was once my greatest pleasure, and will be my greatest honour hereafter. Instead of them, accept of my hearty wishes, that the great reputation you have acquired so early may increase more and more: and that you may long serve your country with those excellent talents and unblemished integrity, which have so powerfully recommended you to the most gracious and amiable monarch that ever filled a throne. May the frankness and generosity of your spirit continue to soften and subdue your enemies, and gain you many friends, if possible, as sincere as yourself. When you have found such, they cannot wish you more true happiness than I, who am, with the greatest zeal,

DEAR SIR, your most entirely affectionate Friend,

June 4, 1719.

And faithful obedient Servant,
J. ADDISON.

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