Walks Through Bath: Describing Every Thing Worthy of Interest, Including Walcot and Widcombe, and the Surrounding Vicinity , Also an Excursion to Clifton and Bristol Hot-wells

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Meyler and son, 1819 - Bath (England) - 329 pages
 

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Page 144 - Near yonder copse, where once the garden smiled, And still where many a garden -flower grows wild; There, where a few torn shrubs the place disclose, The village preacher's modest mansion rose. A man he was to all the country dear, And passing rich with forty pounds a year...
Page 70 - Looking tranquillity ! it strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart.
Page 144 - Unskilful he to fawn, or seek for power By doctrines fashioned to the varying hour; Far other aims his heart had learned to prize, More bent to raise the wretched than to rise. His house was known to all the vagrant train, He chid their wanderings, but relieved their pain...
Page 105 - THE tree of deepest root is found Least willing still to quit the ground ; 'Twas therefore said by ancient sages, That love of life increased with years So much, that in our latter stages, When pains grow sharp, and sickness rages, The greatest love of life appears.
Page 198 - Can storied urn or animated bust Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath ? Can Honour's voice provoke the silent dust, Or Flatt'ry soothe the dull cold ear of death?
Page 192 - VOL 10 — 17 257 clouded his perspicacity. To every work he brought a memory full fraught, together with a fancy fertile of original combinations, and, at once, exerted the powers of the scholar, the reasoner, and the wit.
Page 147 - And pinch'd with cold, and shrinking from the shower, With heavy heart deplores that luckless hour, When idly first, ambitious of the town, She left her wheel and robes of country brown.
Page 102 - That all whisperers of lies and scandal, be taken for their authors. 11. That all repeaters of such lies, and scandal, be shunned by all company ; — except such as have been guilty of the same crime. NB Several men of no character, old women and young ones of questioned reputation, are great authors of lies in these places, being of the sect of levellers.
Page 147 - Sweet as the primrose peeps beneath the thorn ; Now lost to all; her friends, her virtue fled, Near her betrayer's door she lays her head...
Page 22 - His name was Bolus. Benjamin Bolus, though in trade, (Which oftentimes will genius fetter) Read works of fancy, it is said, And cultivated the belles lettres.

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