Virgil: The Aeneid

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Cambridge University Press, 2004 - Fiction - 111 pages
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The Aeneid is a landmark of literary narrative and poetic sensibility. This 2004 guide gives a full account of the historical setting and significance of Virgil's epic, and discusses the poet's use of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, as well as the most celebrated episodes in the poem, including the tragedy of Dido and Aeneas' visit to the underworld. The volume examines Virgil's psychological and philosophical insights, and explains the poem's status as the central classic of European culture. The final chapter considers the Aeneid's influence on later writers including Dante and the Romantics. The guide to further reading has been updated and will prove to be an invaluable resource to students coming to The Aeneid for the first time.

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Contents

Background
1
2 Life of Virgil
7
3 The Eclogues
10
4 The Georgics
15
5 Metrical unity and continuity
19
Virgil and Homer
23
7 The Aeneas Legend
24
8 The Odyssean Aeneid
26
15 The world of the dead
71
16 Fatherfigures
79
17 Juno
83
18 War and heroism
87
19 Fate and free will
90
20 Conclusions
94
The afterlife of the Aeneid
97
22 Virgil and Dante
98

9 The Iliadic Aeneld
30
Reading the Aeneid
34
11 The story
36
12 Structure
40
13 Expression and sensibility
47
14 Narrative technique
63
23 Virgil and renaissance epic
100
24 Virgil and romanticism
102
Principal characters of the poem
104
Guide to further reading
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