The life of Samuel Johnson. [With] The principal corrections and additions to the first edition, Volume 3

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Page 250 - But, Sir, there is another amongst them for you : ' He would not flatter Neptune for his trident, ' Or Jove for his power to thunder.'" JOHNSON. " There is nothing marked in that. No. Sir, Garagantua is the best." Notwithstanding this ease and good humour, when I, a little while afterwards, repeated his sarcasm on Kenrick,
Page 294 - cano, Sol occubuit, nox nulla secuta est.' " EDWARDS. " You are a philosopher, Dr. Johnson. I have tried too in my time to be a philosopher; but, I don't know how, cheerfulness was always breaking in:"—Mr. Burke, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Mr. Courtenay,
Page 200 - Here's to the next insurrection of the negroes in the West Indies." His violent prejudice against our West Indian and American settlers appeared whenever there was an opportunity. Towards the conclusion of his " Taxation no Tyranny," he says, " how is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes ?" and in his conversation with Mr. Wilkes
Page 255 - and waste on the other, by which, on the same income, another man lives shabbily, cannot be defined. It is a very nice thing; as one man wears his coat out much sooner than another, we cannot tell how." We talked of war. JOHNSON. " Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier, or not having been at sea.
Page 387 - but it often dies in the socket; a very few names may be considered as perpetual lamps that shine unconsumed. From the authour of ' Fitzosborne's letters' I cannot think myself in much danger, I met him only once about thirty years ago, and in some small dispute reduced him to whistle;
Page 109 - Let no renewed hostilities invade " Th' oblivious grave's inviolable shade. " Let one great payment every claim appease, " And him who cannot hurt, allow to please ; " To please by scenes, unconscious of offence, " By harmless merriment, or useful sense. " Where aught of bright or fair the piece displays, " Approve it only;—'tis too late to praise.
Page 367 - company at a tavern in the evening. Every man is to take care of his own wisdom and his own virtue, without minding too much what others think " He said "Dodsley first mentioned to me the scheme of an English Dictionary; but I had long thought of it BOSWELL You did not know what you were
Page 152 - I do not like to take an emetick, (said Taylor,) for fear of breaking some small vessels."—" Poh ! (said Johnson,) if you have so many things that will break, you had better break your neck at once, and there's an end on't. You will break no small vessels: " (blowing with high derision.)
Page 233 - 3 Pope thus introduces this story : " Faith in such case if you should prosecute, " I think Sir Godfrey should decide the suit, " Who sent the thief who stole the cash away, " And punish'd him that put it in his way." Imitations of Horace, Book II. Epist. ii.
Page 345 - That was a fine passage." JOHNSON. " Yes, Sir: there was another fine passage too, which he struck out: - When I was a young man, being anxious to distinguish myself, I was perpetually starting new propositions. But I soon gave this over; for, I found that generally what was new was false.'

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