history of the indian arcipelago

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 107 - One of these being put into the small tube that projects from the side of the opium pipe, that tube is applied to a lamp, and the pill being lighted, is consumed at one whiff or inflation of the lungs, attended with a whistling noise. The smoke is never emitted by the mouth, but usually receives vent through the nostrils, and sometimes by adepts, through the passage of the ears and eyes.
Page 25 - In stature they seldom exceed five feet ; their limbs are disproportionately slender, their bellies protuberant, with high shoulders and large heads ; and, strange to find in this part of the world, they are a degenerate race of Negroes with woolly hair,* flat noses, and thick lips ; their eyes are small and red, their skin of deep sooty black, whilst their countenances exhibit the extreme of wretchedness : a horrid mixture of famine and ferocity.
Page 18 - ... done over the negroes of the west. All the indigenous civilization of the Archipelago has sprung from them ; and the negro race is constantly found in the most savage state. That race is to be traced from one extremity of the Archipelago to another, but is necessarily least frequent where the most...
Page 48 - Then said the King : I, and the rest of these Nobles about me, will sing a Psalme to God for your prosperitie, and so they did very solemnly. And after it was ended, the King said : I would heare you sing another Psalme, although in your owne language. So there being in the company some twelve of us, we sung another Psalme ; And after the Psalme ended, the Generall tooke his leave of the King...
Page 111 - Of the passion of the Javanese for play, we have another striking illustration in the artifice resorted to by the proprietors of treasure, or other valuable property, to protect it at night from the depredation of thieves, when it is transported from one part of the country to another. The only antidote to the supine carelessness and somnolency of the Javanese is play, and the proprietor of the property, therefore, furnishes the party with a sum to gamble for, which insures a degree of vigilance...
Page 187 - ... upright on the ground ; on which the fire itself is made. Near the lower end there is a small hole in the side of the trunk next the fire made to receive a pipe ; through •which the wind is driven to the fire by a great bunch of fine feathers, fastened to one end of...
Page 398 - Gomuti palm is fit to yield toddy when nine or ten years old, and continues to yield it for two years, at the average rate of three quarts a day. " When newly drawn the liquor is clear, and in taste resembles fresh must. In a very short time it becomes turbid, whitish, and somewhat acid, and quickly runs into the vinous fermentation, acquiring an intoxicating quality. In this state great quantities are consumed ; a still larger quantity is applied to the purpose of yielding sugar.
Page 74 - Among the nations of Celebes," we read," the women appear in public without any scandal : they take an active concern in all the business of life; they are consulted by the men on all public affairs, and frequently raised to the throne, and that too when the monarchy is elective. Here the woman eats with her husband, nay, by a custom which points at the equality of the sexes, always from the very same dish, the only distinction left to the latter being that of eating from the right side.
Page 130 - Rama. The acting of the persons who represent these characters is less constrained, more bustling, and more natural: than that of any others. So much drollery is frequently displayed as to convince us that the Javanese have considerable comic powers...
Page 130 - ... be transgressed, that the performance by scenic shadows should be confined exclusively to the representations of Hindu story ; the true acting to the most ancient portion of their own legendary history, and the ordinary puppet-show to the more modern. Besides the more regular dramatic entertainments now alluded to, there are two others occasionally introduced, in the manner of interludes, between the scenes of the more regular performances, which afford more amusement to the stranger. One is...

Bibliographic information