The Presidential Republic: Executive Representation and Deliberative Democracy

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 1997 - Law - 241 pages
For two centuries, American presidents have considered themselves to be representatives of the American people. In this detailed study of presidential representation, Gary Gregg explores the theory, history, and consequences of presidents acting as representatives in the American political system. Gregg explores questions such as what it means to be a representative, how the Founding Fathers understood the place of the presidency in the Republic established by the Constitution, and the effects a representational presidency has on deliberative democracy. This important examination of the presidency's place in our political system is essential reading for those interested in American political theory, constitutional studies, and American history.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Political Representation and the Presidency
13
Representation and the Presidency in The Federalist
47
Whiggism and Presidentialism in US History
79
The Public Presidency
123
The Modern Presidency and Representative Government
159
Conclusion Deliberative Democracy in the Presidential Republic
195
Bibliography
219
Index
235
About the Author
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Gary L. Gregg, II is assistant professor of political science at Clarion University of Pennsylvania.

Bibliographic information