The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 3

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W. Pickering, 1852
 

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Page 15 - And unburied remain Inglorious on the plain : Give the vengeance due To the valiant crew ! Behold how they toss their torches on high, How they point to the Persian abodes And glittering temples of their hostile gods.
Page 16 - Ere heaving bellows learn'd to blow, While organs yet were mute, Timotheus, to his breathing flute And sounding lyre Could swell the soul to rage, or kindle soft desire. At last divine Cecilia came, Inventress of the vocal frame; The sweet enthusiast from her sacred store Enlarged the former narrow bounds, And added length to solemn sounds, With Nature's mother-wit, and arts unknown before — Let old Timotheus yield the prize Or both divide the crown; He raised a mortal to the skies; She drew an...
Page 18 - Chase from our minds the infernal foe, And peace, the fruit of love, bestow ; And, lest our feet should step astray, Protect and guide us in the way. Make us eternal truths receive, And practise all that we believe : Give us thyself, that we may see The Father, and the Son, by thee. Immortal honor, endless fame, Attend the...
Page 10 - Twas at the royal feast, for Persia won By Philip's warlike son : Aloft in awful state...
Page 301 - A mob of cobblers, and a court of kings: Light fumes are merry, grosser fumes are sad: Both are the reasonable soul run mad: And many monstrous forms in sleep we see, That neither were, nor are, nor e'er can be.
Page 14 - Think, O think it worth enjoying! Lovely Thais sits beside thee, Take the good the gods provide thee.
Page 11 - None but the brave None but the brave None but the brave deserves the fair ! Timotheus placed on high Amid the tuneful quire With flying fingers touch'd the lyre : The trembling notes ascend the sky And heavenly joys inspire.
Page 179 - Milton was the poetical son of Spenser, and Mr. Waller of Fairfax, for we have our lineal descents and clans as well as other families. Spenser more than once insinuates that the soul of Chaucer was transfused into his body, and that he was begotten by him two hundred years after his decease.
Page 193 - Chaucer, would deprive the greater part of their countrymen of the same advantage, and hoard him up, as misers do their grandam gold, only to look on it themselves, and hinder others from making use of it. In sum, I seriously protest, that no man ever had, or can have, a greater veneration for Chaucer than myself. I have translated some part of his works, only that I might perpetuate his memory, or at least refresh it, amongst my countrymen.
Page 180 - What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me that my only difficulty is to choose or to reject, to run them into verse or to give them the other harmony of prose...

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