A Day by the Fire: And Other Papers, Hitherto Uncollected

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S. Low, Son and Marston, 1870 - English essays - 368 pages
 

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Page 80 - The Oracles are dumb ; No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving : No nightly trance or breathed spell Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell.
Page 27 - LAWRENCE, of virtuous father virtuous son, Now that the fields are dank, and ways are mire, Where shall we sometimes meet, and by the fire Help waste a sullen day, what may be won From the hard season gaining? Time will run On smoother, till Favonius reinspire The frozen earth, and clothe in fresh attire The lily and rose, that neither sowed nor spun.
Page 359 - No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell : Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it ; for I love you so That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then should make you woe.
Page 72 - How ill this taper burns ! Ha ! who comes here ? I think it is the weakness of mine eyes, That shapes this monstrous apparition. It comes upon me: —art thou any thing? Art thou some god, some angel, or some devil, That mak'st my blood cold, and my hair to stare ? Speak to me, what thou art.
Page 199 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid on a dolphin's back Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath. That the rude sea grew civil at her song, And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 117 - As bees In spring-time, when the Sun with Taurus rides, Pour forth their populous youth about the hive In clusters; they among fresh dews and flowers Fly to and fro, or on the smoothed plank, The suburb of their straw-built citadel, New rubbed with balm, expatiate, and confer Their state affairs: so thick the aery crowd Swarmed and were straitened; till, the signal given, Behold a wonder!
Page 83 - When in one night, ere glimpse of morn, His shadowy flail hath threshed the corn That ten day-labourers could not end; Then lies him down, the lubber fiend, And, stretched out all the chimney's length, Basks at the fire his hairy strength; And crop-full out of doors he flings, Ere the first cock his matin rings.
Page 1 - Oxford University ENGLISH FACULTY LIBRARY Manor Road, Oxford. Tel.: Oxford 49631 Postcode: OX1 3UQ Opening Hours: Monday to Friday: 9.30 am to 7 pm in Full Term. (9.30 am to 1 pm, and 2 pm to 4 pm in Vacations.) Saturday: 9.30 am to 12.30 pm in Full Term only (closed in Vacations). The Library is closed for ten days at Christmas arid at Easter, on Encaenia Day, and for six weeks in August and September.
Page 323 - gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long...
Page 26 - Pronounced, and in his volumes taught, our laws, Which others at their bar so often wrench ; To-day deep thoughts resolve with me to drench In mirth that, after, no repenting draws : Let Euclid rest, and Archimedes pause, And what the Swede intends, and what the French.

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