The Works of Jonathan Swift, Volume 3

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G. Faulkner, 1743

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Page 159 - And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 219 - ... the whole disposition of the words was entirely changed. He then commanded six and thirty of the lads to read the several lines softly as they appeared upon the frame ; and where they found three or four words together that might make part of a sentence, they dictated to the four remaining boys who were scribes.
Page 3 - November, which was the beginning of summer in those parts, the weather being very hazy, the seamen spied a rock, within half a cable's length of the ship; but the wind was so strong, that we were driven directly upon it, and immediately split.
Page 29 - ... and whoever jumps the highest without falling, succeeds in the office. Very often the chief ministers themselves are commanded to...
Page 163 - I was soon informed, both by conversation and reading their histories ; for, in the course of many ages, they have been troubled with the same disease to which the whole race of mankind is subject ; the nobility often contending for power, the people for liberty, and the king for absolute dominion.
Page 43 - These civil commotions were constantly fomented by the monarchs of Blefuscu; and when they were quelled the exiles always fled for refuge to that empire. It is computed that eleven thousand persons have at several times suffered death rather than submit to break their eggs at the smaller end.
Page 98 - I must confess no object ever disgusted me so much as the sight of her monstrous breast, which I cannot tell what to compare with, so as to give the curious reader an idea of its bulk, shape and colour.
Page 220 - And this invention would certainly have taken place, to the great ease as well as health of the subject, if the women, in conjunction with the vulgar and illiterate, had not...
Page 29 - This diversion is only practised by those persons who are candidates for great employments and high favour at court. They are trained in this art from their youth, and are not always of noble birth or liberal education. When a great office is vacant, either by death or disgrace (which often happens), five or six of those candidates petition the emperor to entertain his majesty and the court with a dance on the rope, and whoever jumps the highest without falling, succeeds in the office.
Page 259 - They were the most mortifying sight I ever beheld, and the women more horrible than the men ; besides the usual deformities in extreme old age, they acquired an additional ghastliness, in proportion to their number of years, which is not to be described...

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