The remains of the day

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1990 - Fiction - 245 pages
From the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, here is the universally acclaimed novel--winner of the Booker Prize and the basis for an award-winning film.

This is Kazuo Ishiguro's profoundly compelling portrait of Stevens, the perfect butler, and of his fading, insular world in post-World War II England. Stevens, at the end of three decades of service at Darlington Hall, spending a day on a country drive, embarks as well on a journey through the past in an effort to reassure himself that he has served humanity by serving the "great gentleman," Lord Darlington. But lurking in his memory are doubts about the true nature of Lord Darlington's "greatness," and much graver doubts about the nature of his own life.

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User Review  - addunn3 - www.librarything.com

One of the best books I have listened to in awhile. The perfect butler talks of his profession and incidentally describes world shacking events prior to WWII. The movie does a faithful job of following the book, with only minor plot changes. Read full review

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User Review  - smallself - www.librarything.com

It’s like a series of little interconnected essays, linked beautiful little stories. It’s something that teaches you, in this case about work and dignity. ................................. “..... the ... Read full review

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About the author (1990)

Kazuo Ishiguro was born in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1954 and moved to Britain at the age of five. He is the author of five novels, including The Remains of the Day, an international bestseller that won the Booker Prize and was adapted into an award-winning film. Ishiguro's work has been translated into twenty-eight languages. In 1995, he received an Order of the British Empire for service to literature, and in 1998 was named a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government. He lives in London with his wife and daughter.

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