The Story of Nell Gwyn and the Savings of Charles II.: With the Author's Latest Corrections, Edited, with Introduction, Additional Notes, and a Life of the Author

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Page 182 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Page 76 - I am as free as nature first made man, Ere the base laws of servitude began, When wild in woods the noble savage ran.
Page 34 - Knipp took us all in. and brought to us Nelly, a most pretty woman, who acted the great part of 'Coelia' to-day very fine, and did it pretty well; I kissed her. and so did my wife, and a mighty pretty soul she is.
Page 58 - And so walked all up and down the house above, and then below into the scene-room, and there sat down, and she gave us fruit : and here I read the questions to Knipp, while she answered me, through all her part of " Flora's Figary's,
Page 103 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 204 - Where the king took displeasure, she would mitigate and appease his mind ; where men were out of favour, she would bring them in his grace...
Page 139 - ... she amasses treasure, and makes herself feared and respected by as many as she can. But she did not foresee that she should find a young actress in her way, whom the king dotes on ; and she has it not in her power to withdraw him from her.
Page 177 - I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and profaneness, gaming, and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfulness of God, (it being Sunday evening,) which this day se'nnight I was witness of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland...
Page 90 - One day as the king was walking in the Mall, and talking with Dryden, he said, ' If I was a poet, (and I think I am poor enough to be one,) I would write a poem on such a subject in the following manner,' and then gave him the plan for it.
Page 76 - Think him not duller for this year's delay; He was prepared, the women were away; And men, without their parts, can hardly play. If they, through sickness, seldom did appear, Pity the virgins of each theatre: For, at both houses 'twas a sickly year! And pity us, your servants, to whose cost, In one such sickness, nine whole months are lost.

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