The College Chums: A Novel

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 254 - Any affectation whatsoever in dress implies, in my mind, a flaw in the understanding. Most of our young fellows, here, display some character or other by their dress; some affect the tremendous, and wear a great and fiercely cocked hat, an enormous sword, a short waistcoat, and a black cravat : these I should be almost tempted to swear the peace against, in my own defence, if I were not convinced that they are but meek asses in lions
Page 255 - I were not convinced that they are but meek as.r.53 in lions' skins. Others go in brown frocks, leather breeches, great oaken cudgels in their hands, their hats uncocked, and their hair unpowdered ; and imitate grooms, stagecoachmen, and country bumpkins so well, in their outsides, that I do not make the least doubt of their resembling them equally in their insides. A man of seme carefully avoids any particular character in his dress ; he is accurately clean for his own sake ; but all the rest is...
Page 255 - ... that I do not make the least doubt of their resembling them equally in their insides. A man of sense carefully avoids any particular character in his dress; he is accurately clean for his own sake ; but all the rest is for other people's. He dresses as well, and in the same manner, as the people of sense and fashion of the place where he is. If he dresses better, as he thinks, that is, more than they, he is a fop; if he dresses worse, he is unpardonably negligent; but, of the two, I would rather...
Page 255 - ... all the rest is for other people's. He dresses as well, and in the same manner, as the people of sense and fashion of the place where he is. If he dresses better, as he thinks — that is, more than they — he is a fop; if he dresses worse, he is unpardonably negligent...
Page 252 - Such-a-one has struck a bold stroke;" by which we understand, that he is the first man who has had courage enough to lead up a fashion. Accordingly, when our tailors take measure of us, they always demand " whether we will have a plain suit, or strike a bold stroke?
Page 254 - I confess, I cannot help forming some opinion of a man's sense and character from his dress ; and, I believe, most people do as well as myself. Any affectation whatsoever in dress implies, in my mind, a flaw in the understanding.
Page 253 - ... at an unreasonable distance from his sides; which, with the advantage of a cane, that he brandished in a great variety of irregular motions, made it unsafe for any one to walk within several yards of him. In this manner he took up the whole Mall, his spectators moving on each side of it, whilst he cocked up his hat, and marched directly for Westminster. I cannot tell who this gentleman is, but for...
Page 256 - I would rather have a young fellow too much than too little dressed ; the excess on that side will wear off, with a little age and reflection ; but, if he is negligent at twenty, he will be a sloven at forty, and stink at fifty years old. Dress yourself fine, where others are fine ; and plain, where others are plain ; but take care, always, that your clothes are well made, and fit you, for otherwise they will give you a very awkward air.
Page 250 - ... conceal the breeches, but gartered below it ; large hanging cuffs and lace ruffles ; the skirts of the coats stiffened out with wire or buckram, from between which peeped the hilt of the sword, deprived of the broad and splendid belt in which it swung in the preceding reigns ; blue or scarlet silk stockings with gold or silver clocks ; lace neckcloths ; square-toed short-quartered shoes, with high...
Page 253 - He was of a bulk and stature larger than ordinary, had a red coat, flung open to show a gay calamanco waistcoat. His periwig fell in a very considerable bush upon each shoulder. His arms naturally swang at an unreasonable distance from his sides ; which, with the advantage of a cane that he brandished in a great variety of irregular motions, made it unsafe for any one to walk within several yards of him. In this manner he took up the whole Mall, his spectators moving on each side of it, whilst...

Bibliographic information