The physical and historical geography of the British empire, by a certificated teacher [D.C. Maccarthy].

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Page 222 - WE were now treading that illustrious Island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate...
Page 262 - In all my wanderings round this world of care, In all my griefs — and God has given my share — I still had hopes, my latest hours to crown, Amidst these humble bowers to lay me down...
Page 280 - On Lough Neagh's bank as the fisherman strays, When the clear, cold eve's declining, He sees the round towers of other days, In the wave beneath him shining! Thus shall memory often, in dreams sublime, Catch a glimpse of the days that are over, Thus, sighing, look through the waves of time For the long-faded glories they cover!
Page 230 - THERE is not in the wide world a valley so sweet, As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet; Oh ! the last rays of feeling and life must depart, Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart.
Page 223 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Page 223 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain vOL. IX. t of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins of lona.
Page 262 - THE DESERTED VILLAGE SWEET AUBURN! loveliest village of the plain; Where health and plenty cheered the labouring swain, Where smiling spring its earliest visit paid, And parting summer's lingering blooms delayed : Dear lovely bowers of innocence and ease, Seats of my youth, when every sport could please, How often have I loitered o'er thy green, Where humble happiness endeared each scene...
Page xv - Not yet enslaved, not wholly vile, O Albion ! O my mother Isle ! Thy valleys, fair as Eden's bowers, Glitter green with sunny showers ; Thy grassy uplands gentle swells Echo to the bleat of flocks ; (Those grassy hills, those glittering dells Proudly ramparted with rocks) And Ocean mid his uproar wild Speaks safety to his island-child, Hence for many a fearless age Has social Quiet...
Page 211 - There's some say that we wan, And some say that they wan, And some say that nane wan at a', man : But one thing I'm sure That at Sheriffmuir A battle there was that I saw, man. And we ran, and they ran, And they ran, and we ran, And we ran, and they ran awa', man...
Page 251 - LET Erin remember the days of old, Ere her faithless sons betrayed her; When Malachi wore the collar of gold Which he won from the proud invader...

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