Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Hence the magnitude of the whole body, is to the magnitude of the part immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid, is to that of the body. "
A Course of Mathematics ...: Composed for the Use of the Royal Military ... - Page 229
by Charles Hutton - 1811
Full view - About this book

A General History of Mathematics from the Earliest Times to the Middle of ...

Charles Bossut - Astronomy - 1803 - 540 pages
...vertical line ; and that the whole weight of the body is to the weight of the quantity of fluid displaced, as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the floating body. This general theory he illustrates by various examples taken from the triangle, the...
Full view - About this book

A Course of Mathematics: In Two Volumes. For the Use of Academies ..., Volume 2

Charles Hutton - Mathematics - 1807
...of the fluid as is equal to the immersed part ; and therefore the weights are the same. 285. Carol. 4. Hence the magnitude of the whole body, is to the...specific gravities, are reciprocally as their magnitudes. 286. Carol. 5. And because, when the weight of a body taken in a fluid, is subtracted from its weight...
Full view - About this book

A Plain Elementary and Practical System of Natural Experimental Philosophy ...

John Ewing - Astronomy - 1809 - 538 pages
...weighing them in different fluids. 11. The weight, which a body loses in a fluid, is to its whole weight, as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the body. Because the weight, which the body loses in the fluid, is the weight of the fluid equal in bulk with...
Full view - About this book

A Course of Mathematics: For the Use of Academies as Well as ..., Volume 2

Charles Hutton - Mathematics - 1812
...of the fluid asis equal to the immersed part ; and therefore the weights are the same. 323. Carol. 4. Hence the magnitude of the whole body, is to the...are reciprocally as their magnitudes. ^ 324. Carol. S. And because when the weight of a body taken in a fluid, is subtracted from its weight out of the...
Full view - About this book

English 18th Century Dances, Volume 2

Akeroyde's padd (Dance) - 1812
...as so much of the fluid as is equal to the immersed part, and therefore the weights are the same : hence, the magnitude of the whole body, is to the...equal weight, the densities or specific gravities, arc reciprocally as their magnitudes. After having considered hydrostatics, by which the weight and...
Full view - About this book

Tracts on Mathematical and Philosophical Subjects: Comprising Among Numerous ...

Charles Hutton - Bridges - 1812 - 485 pages
...opposite forces bx and abm becoming equal, then x = am, or 1: m: ; a : x, that is, the whole length is to the part immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid is to that of the cylinder. And , if the latter be equal to half the former, which is nearly the case of fir timber,...
Full view - About this book

A Course of Mathematics ...: For the Use of Academies, as Well as ..., Volume 2

Charles Hutton - Mathematics - 1816
...the •fluid as is equal to the immersed part ; and therefore the weights are the same. 323. Carol. 4. Hence the magnitude of the whole body, is to the...gravities, are reciprocally as their magnitudes. 324. Coro'. 5. And because when the weight of a body taken in a fluid, is subtracted from its weight out...
Full view - About this book

The Mathematical Questions Proposed in the Ladies' Diary: And ..., Volume 4

Thomas Leybourn - Mathematics - 1817
...of hydrostatics, (see ror. 4, p. 220, vol. 2, Dr. Hutton's Course) the magnitude of the whole cone, is to the magnitude of the part immersed, as the specific gravity of the fluid to that of the body, or as 8 to 5 ; but the whole cone, and the part immersed being similar, their...
Full view - About this book

A Course of Mathematics: In Two Volumes ; for the Use of Academies ..., Volume 2

Charles Hutton - Mathematics - 1818
...the fluid as is equal to the immersed part ; and therefore the „ weights are the same. 323. Carol. 4. . Hence the magnitude of the whole body, is to...Carol. 5. And because when the weight of a body taken iu a fluid, is subtracted from its weight out of the fluid, the difference is the weight of an equal...
Full view - About this book

Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory ..., Volume 5

John Mason Good - 1813
...body is equal to the weight of a quantity of the fluid of the same bulk ns the part immersed. Hence, as the specific gravity of the fluid, is to that of the body, so is the whole magnitude of the body, to the magnitude of the part immersed. XIII. The specific gravities...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download PDF