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PAGE

339
338
352
336

Demosthenes,.....
Dickens, Charles,..
Dido, ......
Dominic, Saint, ..
Doon,.....
Duganne, A.J. H.,
Dunstan, Saint,...

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Abraham,.....
Aganippe,.....
Aikin, John,....
Aldrich, T. B.,
Alexander,.,..
Alhambra,....................
Amherst, .......
Apollo, .......
Araxes,......
Aristotle,.....
Arthur,......
Athens,....
Aztec, ......

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E.
Egeria,.............
Elijah,.....
Elixir Vitæ,..........
Ellcnborough, Lo
Eubea, ...............
Endicott, Johr,....
Eugene, Prince,....

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B.
Babel, .....
Barré, Isaac,.....

350
Beecher, Henry

345
Blanc, Mont,..

356
Blenheim,........
Blue Ridge,....
Bonaparte, Napoleon,.
Boyd, A. K. H.,.....
Brown, John,.........

340
Browning, Elizabeth B.,... 358
Bryant, William C.,..............

333
Burke, Edmund,.....

350
Burns, Robert,......

356
Bute, John Stuart, Earl of, ........ 356
Bute, Isle of,...

356
Byron, Lord,...

347

Felton, Cornelius C.,...

338
Fleetwood, Charles,....

316
Floyd, John B.,........
Foster, John,.......

357
Fox, Charles J.,...

351
Francis I.,......

344
Franklin, Benjamin,..............
Froude, James Antony,........... 357

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Cæsars,.....

344
Cain, .........
Cambyses, .....

335
Campbell, Lord John,..

356
Campbell, Thomas,

337
Cambridge,...
Camden, Lord,........

350
Canning, George, .....

351
Castile, ...............
Cephrenes,...

334
Chamouni,.....

356
Charles V.,.....
Charlestown,...

351
Chatham, Earl of,......
Chat Moss,......

357
Cheops,.....

334
Churchill, John,...

353
Cintra,..............

348
Clarens, .........

348
Clay, Henry,.............
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor,...
Concord,..................
Cromwell, Thomas,..
Crusoe, Robinson, ................
Cuzco, ....

G.
Geneva, Lake,.....
Granada,............

359
Grattan, Henry, .....

351
Grub Street,........

........... 351

H.
Hale, Nathan,.....
Hamilton, Gail,....
Harold, ............

348
Harper's Ferry,....
Hawthorne, Nathaniel,

358
Hayes,.....

350
Helicon,........

338
Heliconian Rill,

354
Hemans, Felicia,...

346
Herschei, Sir John F. W.
Hesiod, ...............
Higginson, Francis,.....

359
Highland Light House,..

345
Holland, J. G.,....

333
Holmes, Oliver. W.,.

342
Homer,..........

334
Horeb,.....

355
Hunt, Leigh,.........

333
1.
Inca, .....
Isabella, the Catholic,............. 359
Isis, .......

......... 335
Ismenus, .

338
Israel, ......

J.
Joanna,.....

360

336
Judson, Emily
uuso1), LI
C..................

338
Jupiter,.....

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K.
Kingsley, Charles, ..........

PAGE

PAGE
Quint, Alonzo H.,....
Quito, ............................ 356

. 340

L.

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Lake Leman,.................
Lamb, Charles,.......
Leonidas,.......................
Lexington,........................
Lincoln, Abraham,.......
London, .............
Longfellow,........
Lowell, James R.,........
Luther, Martin,......

... 341

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Read, Thomas B....................
Rebecca, the Jewess.....
Remus, .....

335
Rhine,........

348
Rockingham,....

350
Rome, ....

348
Romulus,......

335
Rosse, Lord,.....
Rousseau, Jean J.,....

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M.
Macaulay, T. B............

...... 349
McLellan, Isaac,...
Mansfield, Lord,.....
Marathon, .........
Marion,......

352
Marlborough, Duke of,

353
Martyr, Peter,...

360
Medford,

351
Memnon, ...........

334
Middlesex,...........

352
Minerva Press,....

349
Mitchel, Ormsby M.,.

353
Montfort, Simon De...

347
Moore, Thomas,.........
More, Hannah,................... 337
Morris, George,.....

... 331
Moscow, ........

... 344
Mount Carmel,.....
Mytilene,..........

.... 339

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Saxe, John G.,..
Schiller,.............
Scott, Sir Walter,....
Shakspeare, William,
Shenandoah,......
Sleeper, John S.,.
Smith, Horace,....
Socrates,................
Solomon,....
Southey, Robert, ......
Sphins,: ......
Spice Islands,...........
Springfield,........
Stephen. Master,................
Street, Alfred B.,.
Stuart, John, .....

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Tagus,............................ 348
Talus, ..........

346
Taylor, B, F.,....

334
Taylor, Jane,.....

355
Tarleton, Bannastre,...
Thebes,........

334
Thermopylæ, ..
Thorpe, T. B.,..

337
Thrace,...........

352
Tunis,............. ................ 312

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P.

Vane, Sir Henry,. .............. 346
Pactolus,..........

354
Parnassus,.............

w.
Pentelicus,.......
Peruvians,.............

Westminster, .....
Petrarch,..

Westminster Abbey, .....

... 350)
Pharaoh, ..............

........... 335
Whittier, John G.,......

331
Pierpont, John,....

Wilberforce, William,

... 351
Pindus,..
.... 335

345

Wirt, William,.
Pitt, William, ....

349
Wise, Henry A.,......

341
Pittacus,.........

339

Wolsey, Thomas, .....
Plutus,......:

354
Wordsworth, William,

347
Pompey's Pillar,...

334
Worms,...........

..... 343
Potomac......

340
Prescott, William H.,....

355
Proctor, Edna Dean,.

X.
Prometheus, ....

348
Puritans, .......

346 | Ximenes, Francisco, .............. 360

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HOW THE BOOK SHOULD BE USED.

tyr

GENERAL SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS. 1. LET the principles and directions given in the Introduction be thoroughly learned. They occupy less space than is often assigned to such introductory matter, and the learning of them will not be a difficult task.

2. These principles and directions should be practically applied to each of the reading exercises.

3. Every pupil should also be thoroughly drilled in the phonic analysis, according to directions given in that article.

4. We hope teachers will fully understand that the matters just spoken of in 1, 2 and 3, are meant for actual use, and are not inserted to fill up the book, or to give it a respectable appearance.

5. Logically, these matters should be mastered before the reading is begun; but, practically, it will be best to have them learned in connection with exercises in reading,

-every lesson to consist in part of principles, and in part of practice in reading.

HOW TO USE THE ANALYTICAL QUESTIONS. 1. Let the class take for a lesson, say, for reading, the first paragraph of the first article, entitled TREES, together with the general questions on the piece, and the special questions on the first paragraph. Only very able and well disciplined pupils can do so much at one lesson. For most, the lesson should not exceed one half of the amount here indicated, and for some not more than one fourth.

2. Let this course be pursued—the teacher dividing the analysis into lessons of suitable length-until the entire selection has been thoroughly learned and reviewed.

3. While doing what is here indicated, let a constant application be made of the knowledge acquired in the phonic drill. This knowledge can be retained only by constant use.

4. The teacher may, at his discretion, either pass next to another selection analyzed in the book, or he may take up, for analysis and reading, a piece similar to the one already read. The pupils should prepare such written questions as they can by way of analysis,—the teacher carefully examining them, and supplying additional ones wherever necessary to develop the thought.

5. The pieces analyzed in the book should be studied before other similar ones are attempted.

6. As much of the original thinking as possible should come upon the pupil, and he should, finally, make full and complete analyses for himself.

7. The appendix should be carefully examined when a lesson has been assigned, and all the notes bearing upon the piece carefully learned. Many other points will require explanation beside those set forth in the notes. -- 8. Every good teacher will possess one or the other (it would be best to have both) of our unabridged American dictionaries, and will strive to be on intimate terms with its pages. The notation of the recent edition of Webster is adopted in this book, but there will be no inconvenience in using Worcester in connection with it.

9. The teacher must be prepared to illustrate by his own reading the proper rendering of every sentence the pupils are called upon to pronounce. It is impossible to teach young people, or any one else, to read well, except by setting a good example before them.

10. LET THE TEACHER SEE TO IT THAT, AT EVERY STEP, HE IS THOROUGHLY MASTER OF THE LESSON IN ALL ITS BEARINGS,—THAT HE NOT ONLY KNOWS IT FOR HIMSELF, BUT IS PREPARED TO LEAD HIS PUPILS INTO A CLEAR AND COMPLETE UNDERSTANDING OF IT.

INTRODUCTION

TO THE

PHONIC ANALYSIS.

2

ested in lements in a

No one will deny that a ready and exact enunciation is a prerequisite to good reading. Persuaded that such promptness and accuracy can be best attained by a thorough drill on what are called the vocal elements, the following Lessons for some time tested in the Illinois State Normal University-are presented for use in other schools.

Every intelligent and unprejudiced mind will welcome any means by which loose and pernicious habits of enunciation may be cast off, and correct ones formed in their stead. This is not an easy task. The pupil of fifteen or eighteen years of age, who has been accustomed to say givún for giv'n, kitch'n for kitchen, and smort for smart, will not be likely, by a single effort, to set his speech, right. By well directed and persevering effort he can do it: with proper guidance and encouragement he will do it.

Most who thus mar the English are unconscious of their defects. They have either never observed a different style of pronunciation possibly have heard no otheror they have accounted whatever differences they have noticed in others as peculiarities, worthy only of a smile or a jest. If the ear, because of dullness, has failed to report the actual diversity, it must be quickened ; if the judgment and taste are false, they are to be corrected : in both cases, the organs, untrained to the just utterance of the language, are to be exercised on elements, combinations, syllables, words, and collocations of words, until they become loyal to well-spoken English.

Nor is it to those alone whose enunciation or pronunciation is excessively bad, that this drill is of use. To the

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