History of the Colonization of the United States, Volume 2

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C.C. Little & J. Brown, 1841 - United States
 

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Page 144 - For I think that God hath set forth us the apostles last, as it were appointed to death : for we are made a spectacle unto the world, and to angels, and to men.
Page 46 - ... you shall be governed by laws of your own making, and live a free, and, if you will, a sober and industrious people.
Page 49 - on the broad pathway of good faith and good will ; no advantage shall be taken on either side, but all shall be openness and love.
Page 268 - ... every man who prefers freedom to a life of slavery will bless and honor you as men who have baffled the attempt of tyranny; and by an impartial and uncorrupt verdict, have laid a noble foundation for securing to ourselves, our posterity, and our neighbors that to which nature and the laws of our country have given us a right — the liberty — both of exposing and opposing arbitrary power (in these parts of the world, at least) by speaking and writing truth.
Page 157 - Mississippi bore on its sands the trail of men; a little foot-path was discerned leading into a beautiful prairie, and, leaving the canoes, Joliet and Marquette resolved alone to brave a meeting with the savages. After walking six miles they beheld a village on the banks of a river, and two others on a slope at a distance of a mile and a half from the first. The river was the Meu-in-gou-e-na, or Moingona, of which we have corrupted the name into Des Moines.
Page 281 - Christianity, have this fortnight been pondering methods to make more effectual that horrid traffic of selling negroes. It has appeared to us that six-and-forty thousand of these wretches are sold every year to our plantations alone ! — it chills one's blood.
Page 54 - I have led the greatest colony into America that ever any man did upon a private credit; and the most prosperous beginnings that ever were in it, are to be found among us.
Page 256 - Lo! swarming southward on rejoicing suns, Gay Colonies extend ; the calm retreat Of undeserved distress, the better home Of those whom bigots chase from foreign lands. Not built on Rapine, Servitude, and Woe, And in their turn some petty tyrant's prey ; But, bound by social Freedom, firm they rise ; Such as, of late, an Oglethorpe has form'd, And, crowding round, the charm'd Savannah sees.
Page 121 - We cannot but humbly recommend unto the Government, the speedy and vigorous Prosecution of such as have rendered themselves obnoxious...
Page 159 - we must, indeed, ask the aid of the Virgin." Armed with bows and arrows, with clubs, axes, and bucklers, amidst continual whoops, the natives, bent on war, embark in vast canoes made out of the trunks of hollow trees ; but, at the sight of the mysterious peace-pipe held aloft, God touched the hearts of the old men, who checked the impetuosity of the young ; and, throwing their bows and quivers into the canoes, as a token of peace, they prepared a hospitable welcome. The next day, a long, wooden...

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