The Monthly Review

Front Cover
R. Griffiths., 1814
Editors: May 1749-Sept. 1803, Ralph Griffiths; Oct. 1803-Apr. 1825, G. E. Griffiths.
 

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Page 237 - Hell hath no limits, nor is circumscribed In one self place ; for where we are is hell, And where hell is there must we ever be: And, to conclude, when all the world dissolves, And every creature shall be purified, All places shall be hell that is not heaven.
Page 311 - Till now I never understood the reason of the policy and prudence of the Spaniards in suffering the Inquisition among them; and certainly it will never be well with us till something like unto the Spanish Inquisition be in England.
Page 237 - Was this the face that launched a thousand ships, And burnt the topless towers of Ilium ? Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss! Her lips suck forth my soul ! See, where it flies ! Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again. Here will I dwell, for Heaven is in these lips, And all is dross that is not Helena.
Page 230 - In perusing a corrupted piece he must have before him all possibilities of meaning, with all possibilities of expression. Such must be his comprehension of thought, and such his copiousness of language. Out of many readings possible he must be able to select that which best suits with the state, opinions, and modes of language prevailing in every age, and with his authour's particular cast of thought and turn of expression. Such must be his knowledge, and such his taste.
Page 231 - Ah, Faustus, Now hast thou but one bare hour to live, And then thou must be damn'd perpetually! Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of Heaven, That time may cease, and midnight never come; Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again and make Perpetual day; or let this hour be but A year, a month, a week, a natural day, That Faustus may repent and save his soul!
Page 316 - I have, and for my business here, know that after many waitings, watchings, solicitings, and disputes in council, this day my country was confirmed to me under the great seal of England, with large powers and privileges, by the name of Pennsylvania ; a name the king would give it in honor of my father.
Page 317 - ... would have the people live; and then you have right and boldness to punish the transgressor. Keep upon the square, for God sees you; therefore do your duty; and be sure you see with your own eyes, and hear with your own ears. Entertain no lurchers; cherish no informers for gain or revenge; use no tricks, fly to no devices to support or cover injustice, but let your hearts be upright before the Lord, trusting in Him above the contrivances of men, and none shall be able to hurt or supplant.
Page 141 - The fermentation and putrefaction of organized substances in the free atmosphere, are noxious processes; beneath the surface of the ground they are salutary operations. " In this case, the food of plants is prepared where it can be used ; and that which would offend the senses and injure the health, if exposed, is converted by gradual processes into forms of beauty and of usefulness ; the fetid gas is rendered a constituent of the aroma of the flower, and what might be poison, becomes nourishment...
Page 317 - God, loving the peop:e, and hating covetousness. Let justice have its impartial course, and the law free passage. Though to your loss, protect no man against it ; for you are not above the law, but the law above you.
Page 312 - I ask, if it be according to the fundamental laws of England, that any Englishman should be fined or amerced but by the judgment of his peers or jury; since it expressly contradicts the 14th and 29th chapters of the Great Charter of England, which say, " No freeman ought to be amerced but by the oath of good and lawful men of the vicinage.

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