The American Journal of Education, Volume 15

Front Cover
Henry Barnard
F.C. Brownell, 1865 - Education
 

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Page 206 - Yet in the church I had rather speak five words with my understanding, that by my voice I might teach others also, than ten thousand words in an unknown tongue.
Page 124 - An ambassador is an honest man, sent to lie abroad for the good of his country.
Page 198 - NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, Sir!
Page 198 - Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth, namely twentyfour grinders, four eye-teeth, and twelve incisive. Sheds coat in the spring ; in marshy countries, sheds hoofs, too. Hoofs hard, but requiring to be shod with iron. Age known by marks in mouth.
Page 9 - What Constitutes a State? WHAT constitutes a State ? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate — Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned — Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride — Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No; men, high-minded men...
Page 16 - ... it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates, in all future periods of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them; especially the university at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns...
Page 9 - Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No ! Men, high-minded men, With powers as far above dull brutes endued, In forest, brake or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain, — These constitute a State ; And sovereign law, that State's collected will, • O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing...
Page 530 - That ye shall say, It is the sacrifice of the LORD'S passover, who passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when he smote the Egyptians, and delivered our houses.
Page 380 - ... it will be known as it is to your shame ; for there cannot be a greater reproach to a gentleman than to be accounted a liar.
Page 128 - To another, whose earnestness exceeded his knowledge, and was still railing against the Papists, he gave this advice : ' Pray, sir, forbear till you have studied the points better ; for the wise Italians have this proverb : " He that understands amiss concludes worse." And take heed of thinking, the farther you go from the Church of Rome, the nearer you are to God.

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