An Exposition of the Natural System of the Nerves of the Human Body: With a Republication of the Papers Delivered to the Royal Society, on the Subject of the Nerves

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A. & R. Spottiswoode, 1824 - Electronic books - 392 pages

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Page 354 - The nerves have been considered so generally as instruments for stimulating the muscles, without thought of their acting in the opposite capacity, that some additional illustration may be necessary here. Through the nerves is established the connection between the muscles, not only that connection by which muscles combine to one effort, but also that relation between the classes of muscles by which the one relaxes and the other contracts.
Page 354 - ... in the opposite capacity, that some additional illustration may be necessary here. Through the nerves is established the connection between the muscles, not only that connection by which muscles combine to one effort, but also that relation between the classes of muscles by which the one relaxes and the other contracts. I appended a weight to a tendon of an extensor muscle, which gently stretched it and drew out the muscle ; and I found that the contraction of the opponent flexor was attended...
Page 378 - In a foreign review of my former papers the results have been considered as a further proof in favour of experiments. They are, on the contrary, deductions from anatomy, and I have had recourse to experiments, not to form my own opinions, but to impress them upon others. It must be my apology that my utmost efforts of persuasion were lost while I urged my statements on the grounds of anatomy alone.
Page 377 - Experiments have never been the means of discovery ; and a survey of what has been attempted of late years in physiology will prove that the opening of living animals has done more to perpetuate error than to confirm the just views taken from the study of anatomy and natural motions.
Page 322 - ... change to the sensorium, and is not associated with the impression on the retina, so as to affect the idea excited in the mind ? It is owing to the same cause that, when looking on the lamp, by pressing one eye, we can make two images, and we can make the one move over the other. But, if we have received the impression on the retina so as to leave the phantom visible when the eye-lids are shut, we cannot, by pressing one eye, produce any such effect. We cannot, by any degree of pressure, make...
Page 10 - If we select the filament of a nerve, and if its office be to convey sensation, that power shall belong to it in all its course wherever it can be traced ; and wherever in the whole course of that filament, whether it be in the foot, leg, thigh, spine, or brain, it may be bruised, or pricked, or injured in any way, sensation and not motion will result; and perception arising from the impression will be referred to that part of the skin when the remote extremity of the filament is distributed.
Page 321 - If we sit at some distance from a lamp which has a cover of ground-glass, and fix the eye on the centre of it, and then shut the eye and contemplate the phantom in the eye; and if, while the image continues to be present of a fine blue colour, we press the eye aside with the finger, we shall not move that phantom or image, although the circle of light produced by the pressure of the finger against the eyeball moves with the motion of the finger. May not this be accounted for in this manner : the...
Page 293 - With much compassion," says this writer, "as well as astonishment at the goodness of our loving Creator, have I considered the sad state of a certain gentleman, who, as to the rest, was in pretty good health, but only wanted the use of these two lillk muscles that serve to lift up the eyelids, [PI.
Page 29 - After delaying long on account of the unpleasant nature of the operation, I opened the spinal canal of a rabbit, and cut the posterior roots of the nerves of the lower extremity; the creature crawled, but I was deterred from repeating the experiment by the protracted cruelty of the dissection. I reflected, that an experiment would be satisfactory, if done on an animal recently knocked down and insensible...
Page 97 - It is the nerve of taste, and of the salivary glands ; of the muscles of the face and jaws, and of common sensibility. This nerve comes off from the base of the brain in so peculiar a situation, that it alone, of all the nerves of the head, receives roots both from the medullary process of the cerebrum and of the cerebellum. A ganglion is formed upon it near its origin, though some of its filaments pass on without entering into the ganglion.

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