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APPLETONS' SCHOOL READERS.

THE

THIRD READER.

BY
WILLIAM T. HARRIS, A. M., LL.D.,
LATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, ST. LOUIS, MO.

ANDREW J. RICKOFF, A. M.,
LATE SUPERINTENDENT OF INSTRUCTION, CLEVELAND, OHIO.

MARK BAILEY, A. M.,
INSTRUCTOR IN ELOCUTION, YALE COLLEGE.

NEW YORK .:. CINCINNATI ::: CHICAGO
AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY.

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This series of Readers is the result of the practical experience of many years. The books can be used in the same ways as other Readers, but the following suggestions may be of value to some.

The Phonic Method to be continued. Though it has been found that the phonic method gives the pupil a better mastery of “hard” words than any other, yet at this stage of his progress he has still many obstacles to over come. To meet these with advantage, his knowledge of the “power of letters" must be extended and perfected. He must continue to spell words by sound, and note silent letters. His attention must be directed to peculiar combinations of letters by which given sounds are represented. The “Table of Sounds,” page 209, should become as familiar to the child as his letters.

Reading-Matter:-Acquiring additional power over new words as he becomes more familiar with the diacritical marks, the pupil will advance with rapidity and confidence. His principal task now is to learn to read with a pleasant voice and ready expression. With a special view to this, the pieces have been made child-like and simple in thought, style, and spirit. Though the words are longer than those which are used in other Readers of the grade, they will be found no more difficult to understand. They are expressive of the thoughts of children, and should be made a part of every child's vocabulary.

Reading-Lessons.—Except for purposes of special drill, the pieces should be read as wholes, in order that a keen interest in the reading-lessons may be excited and sustained. Interest on the part of the pupil will supersede the necessity of much labor on the part of the teacher.

The Words in Columns at the head of the reading-lessons are intended to be studied for spelling, pronunciation, and meaning, before the lesson is read. The diacritical marks can not be thoroughly learned except by practice in marking words. The best means of making sure that a child comprehends the true meaning of a word is, to require him to use it in a sentence of his own.

Language-Lessons.—Every reading-lesson should be accompanied by an oral language-lesson both upon the reading-matter of the lesson and upon the picture. In these conversations the children should be required to use, in proper relations, the difficult words of the lesson. As any suggestions for oral language-lessons must, in this grade, be for the teacher alone, it has not been deemed advisable to insert them in the child's book. In the written language-work, pains have been taken not to make the exercises tiresome to the pupil or burdensome to the teacher. When desired, they can be extended. If faithfully practiced, they will prove to be fruitful in the best results of education.

How to Read." -The lessons so headed present the most important principles of good reading, in so simple a way that they can be readily understood by even a child. Being made reading exercises, they will not be neglected, as lessons upon elocution usually are when inserted as separate articles, or by way of an “Introduction.” They should be read and reread, till the pupils become familiar with their contents, and their instructions should be followed in the succeeding lessons.

The Spelling-Lessons. The attention of the teacher is called particularly to the manner of reciting a spelling-lesson, which is given on page 205.

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PAGE

XXXIV. How to Read. VI. . . . . Mark Bailey. 91

XXXV. The Wren and the Canary . . . . . . 94

XXXVI. The Tiger . . . . . . .

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.

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97

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XXXVII. The Botany-Lesson . . . . Rebecca D. Rickoff 100

XXXVIII. The Hunted Fawn . . . . . . . 103

XXXIX. The Sparrow in the Ball-Ground. Adapted from H. Weir. 106

XL. A Little Girl's Fancies . Poems written for a Child. 109

XLI. Lost in a Balloon. Part I. . . . . . . 110

XLII. Lost in a Balloon. Part II. . . . . . 115

XLIII. Monkeys .

. . 119

XLIV. How to Read. VII. . . . . Mark Bailey. 122

XLV. What is the Reason? .

. . . 124

XLVI. The Little Strings . . . Rev. Dr. Newman. 126

XLVII. A Dialogue . .

. . . . . 129

XLVIII. “Good Night!” and “Good Morning!” Lord Houghton. 133

XLIX. The Boy who would not be a Silent Liar . . . . 136

L. April Flowers .

. . H. L. Keeler. 139

LI. The Robin and the Snake . . . Mark Bailey. 142

LII. How to Read. VIII. . . . . Mark Bailey. 144

LIII. Caught by the Tide. Part I.

. . . . 146

LIV. Caught by the Tide. Part II. . . . . . 150

LV. The River . . . . . . Curtmann. 153

LVI. Waves on the Sea-Shore . . Aunt Effie's Rhymes. 157

LVII. My Elm-Tree . . . . . Rebecca D. Rickoff. 159

LVIII. Little Brown Hands . . Adapted from M. H. Krout. 162

LIX. A Christmas Party . . . . . . . .

LX. How to Reau. IX. . . . . Mark Bailey. 168

“The Brook in the Hollow.”. Rebecca D. Rickoff. 169

LXI. Rats . . . . .

. . . 171

LXII. What the Winds bring . . Edmund C. Stedman. 173

LXIII. North-wind. .

. . . . . . . . 175

LXIV. The Story of a Toad . . . . . . . 177

LXV. A Story of Long Ago . ..

LXVI. Prudence and the Fairy . . . . . . . 184

LXVII. San Salvador . . . .

189

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LXVIII. Jack-in-the-Pulpit. . . . . J. G. Whittier.

LXIX. Faithful Fido . .

LXX. The Courageous Boy . . . . . . .

202

LXXI. The Child's World . . . . Lilliput Lectures. 204

Spelling-Lessons . . . . . . . . 205

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BOB BROWN'S DOG. Little Bob Brown had a fine large dog, named Rover. Bob and Rover were great friends, and used to play together nearly all day long.

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