Address Unknown: A Novel

Front Cover
HarperCollins, Jun 29, 2021 - Fiction - 96 pages

A rediscovered classic and international bestseller that recounts the gripping tale of a friendship destroyed at the hands of Nazi Germany 

In this searing novel, Kathrine Kressmann Taylor brings vividly to life the insidious spread of Nazism through a series of letters between Max, a Jewish art dealer in San Francisco, and Martin, his friend and former business partner who has returned to Germany in 1932, just as Hitler is coming to power.

Originally published in Story magazine in 1938, Address Unknown became an international sensation. Credited with exposing the dangers of Nazism to American readers early on, it is also a scathing indictment of fascist movements around the world and a harrowing exposé of the power of the pen as a weapon.

A powerful and eloquent tale about the consequences of a friendship—and society—poisoned by extremism, Address Unknown remains hauntingly and painfully relevant today. 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - margaretfield - LibraryThing

short read, two friends sending letters back and forth between US and Germany just before WWII. Something kind of great how it articulates the descent from friendship to antisemitic hate. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - vlcraven - LibraryThing

Originally published in 1939, this slim book carries the weight and impact of a novel five times its size. A fictional correspondence between an American Jew and a German follower of Hitler with a gasp-worthy ending. Read full review

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About the author (2021)

Margot Livesey is the New York Times bestselling author of the novels The Flight of Gemma Hardy, The House on Fortune Street, Banishing Verona, Eva Moves the Furniture, The Missing World, Criminals, and Homework. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Vogue, and the Atlantic, and she is the recipient of grants from both the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation. The House on Fortune Street won the 2009 L. L. Winship/PEN New England Award. Born in Scotland, Livesey currently lives in the Boston area and is a professor of fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

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