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Home he return'd with a wonderful Prize,
And brought the Emperor's Son to the Queen,

Raderer two, &c.

Oh! then bespoke the 'Prentices all,

Living in London both proper and tall,
In a kind Letter sent strait to the Queen,
For Effex's sake they would fight all,

Raderer two, Tandaro te;
Raderer, tadorer, tan do re.

XXVI. A true

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XXVI. The Honour of a London

'Prentice. Being an Account of his matchless Manhood and brave Adventures done in Turkey, and by what

Means he marry'd the King's Daughter, & c.

To the Tune of, All you that love good Fellows, &c.

The following Song also relates to a noble Piece

of Chivalryperform’d in Queen Elizabeth's Days, and therefore claims a Place here; but I must acknowledge my self so ignorant of the History of that Reign, that I cannot yet discover who this famous 'Prentice was,

nor yet any particular Account of the Falt; I shall therefore leave the Poet to tell his own Story.

O

F a worthy London 'Prentice

My Purpose is to speak, And tell his brave Adventures

Done for his Country fake; Seek all the World about,

And you shall hardly find, A Man in Valour to exceed

A 'Prentice gallant Mind.

K 4

He was born in Che hire,

The chief of Men was he,
From thence brought up to London,

A 'Prentice for to be;
A Merchant on the Bridge,

Did like his Service so,
That for three Years his Factor,

To Turkey he should go.
And in that famous Country

One Year he had not been, E'er he by Tilt maintained

The Honour of his Queen, Elizabeth his Princess,

He nobly did make known, To be the Phoenix of the World,

And none but she alone.
In Armour richly gilded,

Well mounted on a Steed,
One Score of Knights most hardy,

One Day he made to bleed;
And brought them all unto the Ground,

Who proudly did deny,
Elizabeth to be the Pearl

Of Princely Majesty.
The King of that same Country

Thereat began to frown,
And will’d his Son, there present,

To pull this Youngster down;
Who at his Father's Words

These boasting Speeches said, Thou art a Traytor, English Boy,

And hast the Traytor play'd. I am no Boy, nor Traytor,

Thy Speeches I defy, For which I'll be revenged

Upon thee by and by,

A

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