The works of John Dryden: now first collected in eighteen volumes. Illustrated with notes, historical, critical, and explanatory, and a life of the author, Volume 17

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Printed for William Miller, 1808 - English literature
 

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Page 84 - And it came to pass at the seventh time, that he said, Behold, there ariseth a little cloud out of the sea, like a man's hand.
Page 85 - And the man of God was wroth with him, and said, Thou shouldest have smitten five or six times ; then hadst thou smitten Syria till thou hadst consumed it ; whereas now thou shalt smite Syria but thrice.
Page 76 - Plutarch, to thy deathless praise Does martial Rome this grateful statue raise ; Because both Greece and she thy fame have shared, (Their heroes written, and their lives compared ;) But thou thyself could'st never write thy own ; Their lives have parallels, but thine has none.
Page 279 - Oh lasting as those colours may they shine, Free as thy stroke, yet faultless as thy line ; New graces yearly like thy works display, • Soft without weakness, without glaring gay; Led by some rule, that guides, but not constrains; And finish'd more through happiness than pains.
Page 319 - Preserved; but I must bear this testimony to his memory, that the passions are truly touched in it, though, perhaps there is somewhat to be desired both in the grounds of them, and in the height and elegance of expression ; but nature is there, which is the greatest beauty.
Page 207 - What will it profit a man to gain the whole world and lose his own soul ?' Remember how often Paul appeals to his holy, just, unblameable life.
Page 309 - ... cattle," says the Poet: or at best, the keepers of cattle for other men : they have nothing which is properly their own ; that is a sufficient mortification for me, while I am translating Virgil. But to copy the best author is a kind of praise if I perform it as I ought; as a copy after Raphael is more to be commended than an original of any indifferent Painter. Under this head of invention is placed the disposition of the work, to put all things in a beautiful order and harmony, that the whole...
Page 293 - The perfection of such stage-characters consists chiefly in their likeness to the deficient faulty nature, which is their original ; only, as it is observed more at large hereafter, in such cases there will always be found a better likeness and a worse, and the better is constantly to be chosen ; I mean in tragedy, which re.preseuts the figures of the highest fonn amongst mankind.
Page 303 - After all, it is a good thing to laugh at any rate ; and if a straw can tickle a man, it is an instrument of happiness. Beasts can weep when they suffer, but they cannot laugh: and, as Sir William Davenant observes, in his Preface to Gondibert, " It is the wisdom of a government to permit plays, (he might have added farces,) as it is the prudence of a carter to put bells upon his horses to make them carry their burdens cheerfully.
Page 309 - Without invention, a painter is but a copier, and a poet but a plagiary of others. Both are allowed sometimes to copy, and translate ; but, as our author tells you, that is not the best part of their reputation. " Imitators are but a servile kind of cattle...

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