Elements of geometry

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Hilliard, Gray, and Company, 1841 - Mathematics - 235 pages
 

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Page 67 - The square of the hypothenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides ; as, 5033 402+302.
Page 9 - If two triangles have the three sides of the one equal to the three sides of the other, each to each, the triangles are congruent.
Page 65 - The areas of two triangles which have an angle of the one equal to an angle of the other are to each other as the products of the sides including the equal angles. A D A' Hyp. In triangles ABC and A'B'C', To prove AABC A A'B'C' A'B' x A'C ' Proof. Draw the altitudes BD and B'D'.
Page 160 - ABC (fig. 224) be any spherical triangle ; produce the sides AB, AC, till they meet again in D. The arcs ABD, ACD, will be...
Page 168 - In any spherical triangle, the greater side is opposite the greater angle ; and conversely, the greater angle is opposite the greater side.
Page 157 - CIRCLE is a plane figure bounded by a curved line, all the points of which are equally distant from a point within called the centre; as the figure ADB E.
Page 8 - Any side of a triangle is less than the sum of the other two sides...
Page 82 - The perimeters of two regular polygons of the same number of sides, are to each other as their homologous sides, and their areas are to each other as the squares of those sides (Prop.
Page 29 - Two equal chords are equally distant from the centre ; and of two unequal chords, the less is at the greater distance from the centre.
Page 182 - CD, &c., taken together, make up the perimeter of the prism's base : hence the sum of these rectangles, or the convex surface of the prism, is equal to the perimeter of its base multiplied by its altitude.

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