History of the Proceedings and Debates of the House of Commons

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Page 168 - Refrain from these men, and let them alone: for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to nought: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 656 - ˇrinds, tenements, hereditaments, penfions, offices, and perfonal eftates, in that part of Great - Britain, called England, Wales, and the town of Berwick upon Tweed ; and that a proportionable cefs, according to the ninth article of the treaty of union, be laid upon that part of Great-Britain called Scotland, 1,500,000!.
Page 243 - ... That an humble Addrefs be prefented to His Majefty, that He will be gracioufly pleafed to give directions, that there be laid...
Page 503 - The bill was then read a fecond time, and ordered to be committed to a Committee of the whole Houfe on Friday next.
Page 409 - And all the pile lies smoking on the ground. His toils, for no ignoble ends design'd, Promote the common welfare of mankind ; No wild ambition moves, but Europe's fears, The cries of orphans, and the widow's tears. Opprest religion gives the first alarms, And injur'd justice sets him in his arms ; His conquests freedom to the world afford, And nations bless the labours of his sword.
Page 186 - That an humble addrefs be prefented to His Majefty, that His Majefty would be gracioufly pleafcd to give directions that a monument fiiould be erected in the collegiate church of St.
Page 661 - ... be paid into the receipt of his majefty's exchequer, to be applied, from time to time, to fuch...
Page 503 - That the order of the day for the fecond reading of the Bill to incapacitate William Abraham, James Anderfon, junior, &c.
Page 40 - The bill was read a firft time, and ordered to be read a fécond time on Monday next.
Page 211 - ... by the Prince of Wales, it appears that the prince has incurred a debt to a large amount, which, if left to be discharged out of his annual income, would render it impossible for him to support an establishment suited to his rank and station. " Painful as it is at all times to his...

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