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“ that place, who by these late distractions & “discontinuance of the Aslizes is threatened by “ the Attorneys & some other Officers now in “ place in those Countyes to be putt off from “ the employment & receivinge of the pro“ fitts of that Office, the rest accountable unto “ the psent Estate, for the rent reserved upon " the Patent, & (at this instant) cald upon for " the arrears of 4 years rents, wherein, for 6 want of Circuits and peaceable times, there “ hath been little profit, & yeat forced to give es satisfaction to the Committee for the Revenue, “ & all this under a ptext that this shold be a “ grievance in those two Countyes wch both “ you (and myself too upon some remembrance “ of the course heretofore) doe know to be no “ grievance but a constant & fettled Revenue to " the Crowne in all England, in the Dutchye c of Lancaster & the several Countyes of North " Wales & South Wales.

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“ My humble fuyte therefore to you on the “ behalfe of my Landlord Sir Rd Wynne & his “ Affignee is this, that he maye, by your fa“ voure, proceede peaceably in the execution of « his Office (wch he hath under both the “ Greate Seale of England & the Seale of the " Chamberlayne of that Countye Palatyne) until “ such time as by any complaynt before the most

“ honor:

6 honorable House or the Committee of the . « Revenue this shal be proved to be any such 6c pretended grievance either in point of right or • of execution. And for this just favoure not 66 onelye Sir Richd Wynne, the Patentee, & 66 his Brother the Allignee, shal be readie in all 56 thankfull acknowledgement to take notice “ thereof, but myselfe, though a stranger & of 6 late acquaintance yeat much your Servant, for your great care of the Justice & quietnes of $6 these partes, in order to theyr obedience to 66 the psent Government, shall be obliged to re“ mayne to the utmost of my poore. Abilitie 66 your “ very faithful & Humble Servant

“ Jo: EBORAC. .qui fuit.

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Bradshaw died before the Restoration, and some of his descendants in the female line were a few years ago in possession of an estate at Chapel in the Frith near Buxton, which had belonged to him.

JOHN MILTON.

Dr. Johnson divined with his usual acumen · when he supposed that Milton had undergone

some bodily discipline while he was at College. Mr. Aubrey was told by Christopher Milton, that his brother John was whipped for some “ unkindnesle” by his first Tutor in the University of Cambridge, Mr. Chapel; and that he was afterwards (though it seemed against the rules of the College) transferred to the tuition of one Mr. Tovell, who died Parson of Lutterworth.

Ut pictura poesis erit,has been often said, and pictor ut poeta perhaps occasionally thought. Mr. Garrick used to call Salvator Rosa the Shakespeare of Painting, and might not the name of the Milton of Painting be transferred to our Mr. FUSELI, a man whose ardent imagination, like that of Milton, unites the terribiles visu forma, as well as the molle atque facetum? Mr. Fuseli has nearly finished a series of pictures from the principal scenes of the Paradise Lost and of the Paradise Regained of that divine Poet, which he intends to exhibit in a gallery to be called “ the Gallery of Milton.” Who appears so fit to transmit and convey the ideas of Milton, as the Painter that seems pofsefied with the same fublimity and force of imagination which inspired

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the Poet? Who but Michael Angelo could have pourtrayed the gigantic ideas of Dante ?

The following lines were addressed to Mr. Fuseli on the subject of his " Gallery of Milton.” They were sent to him soon after he had finished his celebrated picture of “ the Conspiracy of “ Catiline," and were printed in the EUROPEAN MAGAZINE for JANUARY 1795.

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TO HENRY FUSELI, ESQ. Ro A. QUEEN-ANN

STREET EAST.
Artist sublime! with every talent blest,
That Buonarota's ardent mind confeft;
Whose magic colours, and whose varying line,
Embody things or human or divine;
See the vast effort of thy mastering hand,
See impious Cat'line's parricidal band,
By the lamp’s tremulous sepulchral light,
Profane the sacred silence of the night;
To Hell's stern king their curs'd libations pour,
While the chas'd goblet foams with human gore:
See how, in fell and terrible array,
Their shining poignards they at once display;
Direly resolving, at their Chief's behest,
To fheath them only in their Country's breast.
Too well pourtray'd, the scene affects our fight
With indignation, horror, and affright.
Then quit these orgies, and with ardent view
Fam'd Angelo's advent’rous track pursue;
Like him extend thy* terrible career

Beyond the visible diurnal sphere: * La Terribil Via, applied by Agostino Caracci to Michael Angelo.

Burst

Burft Earth's frong barriet, ieek th' aby's of Hong
Where lad dei pair and angu: h ever dzel;
In glowing colours to our eyes diiclcie
Te Monster Sin, the cause of all our wees;
To our appar'd and tortur'd feries bring
Dea:l's horrid image, Terror's banefui Esg;
And at the lat, the folema, dreadfal hour,
We all may biefs thy penci's faviag power;
Our danger from thy pious colours see,
And owe eternity of bliss to thee.
Then to the Hear'n of Heav'ns afcer.d; pourtray
The wonders of the fu gent reaims of day;
Around thy pallet glorious tints difuse,
Mix'd from th' eternal Arch's vivid hues;
With every grace of beauty and of form
Inspire thy mind, and thy rich fancy warm,
Cherub and Seraph, now, in “ burning row,"
Before the Throne of Heaven's high Monarch bow;
And tun'd to golden wires their voices raise,
In everlasting strains of rapt'rous praise.
Bleft Commentator of our Nation's bard,
Admir'd with every reverence of regard,
Whose matchless Muse dares fing in strains fublime,
« Things unattempted yet in profe or rhyme !"
The Critic's painful efforts, cold and dead,
By now degrees inform the cautious head;
Whilst thy effusions, like Heaven's rapid fire,
Dart thro' the heart, and kindred flames inspire,
And at one fash, to our astonish'd eyes
Objects of horror or delight arise.
Proceed, my friend, a Nation safely trust,
To merit splendidly and quickly just;
She the due tribute to thy toils shall pay,
And lavishly her gratitude display.

The

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