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"Tower. At the back of this is a desk for "Strasford's four Secretaries, who carried his "papers, and assisted him in writing and read"ing. At their side is a void for witnesses to "stand; and behind them a long desk at the "wall of the room for Stafford's Counsel at "Law, some five or six able Lawyers, who were "not permitted to dispute in matters of fact, "but questions of right, if any should be inci"dent.

"This is the order of the House Below on "the floor, the same that is used daily in the "Higher House.—Upon the two sides of the "House, east and west, there arose a stage of "eleven ranks of forms, the highest almost "touching the roof. Every one of these forms "went from one end of the room to the other, "and contained about forty men; the two high"est were divided from the rest by a rail; and a "rail at every end cut off some seats. The "Gentlemen of the Lower House sat within the "rails, others without. All the doors were kept "very straitly with guards. We always behoved "to be there a little after five in the morning. "Lord Willoughby Earl of Lindsay, Lord "Chamberlain of England, (Pembroke is Cham"berlain of the Court,) ordered the House with "great difficulty; James Maxwell, Black Rod, z 2 "was

"was Great Usher; a number of other servants, "Gentlemen and Knights, assisted; by favour "we got place within the rail among the Com"mons. The House was full daily before seven. "About eight the Earl of Strafford came in "his barge from the Tower, attended with the "Lieutenant and a guard of musqueteers and "halberdeers. The Lords in their robes were "set about eight. The King was usually half "an hour before them. He came not into his "throne, for that would have marred the action; "for it is the order of England, when the King "appears he speaks what he will, but no other "speaks in his presence. At the back of the "throne were two rooms on the two sides: in the "one, Duke de Vanden, Duke de Valler, and "other French Nobles fat; in the other, the "King, Queen, Princess Mary, the Prince "Elector, and some Court Ladies. The tirlies "that made them to be secret the King brake "down with his own hands, so that they fat in "the eyes of all, but little more regarded than "if they had been absent; for the Lords fat all "covered. Those of the Lower House, and all "other, except the French Noblemen, sat dis"covered when the Lords came, not else. A "number of Ladies were in the boxes above "the rails, for which they paid much money. "It was daily the most glorious Assembly the ** Ifle could asford; yet the gravity not such as I "expected; oft great clamour without about the "doors. In the interval, while Strafford was "making ready for answers, the Lords got al"ways to their feet, walked and chatted: the "Lower Housemen too loud chatting. After "ten, much public eating, not only of confec"tions, but of flesh and bread, bottles of beer "and wine going thick from mouth to mouth "without cups, and all this in the King's eye; "yea, many but turned their backs and let water "go through the forms they sat on. There was "no outgoing to return; and oft the sitting was "till two, three, or four o'clock at night.

"TUESDAY THE THIRTEENTH.

"The seventeenth session. All being set

"as before, Strasford made a speech large two "hours and a half, went through all the articles "but these three, which imported statute-treason, "the fifteenth, twenty-first, twenty-seventh, and "others which were alledged, as he spake, for "constructive and consequential treason. First, "the articles bearing his words, then these "which had his counsels and deeds. To all he "repeated not new, but the best of his former "answers; and in the end, after some lashness "and fagging, he made such a pathetic oration "for an half hour, as ever comedian did upon z 3 "a stage. "a stage. The matter and expression was ex"ceeding brave; doubtless if he had grace or "civil goodness, he is a most eloquent man. "The speech you have it here in print. One "passage made it most spoken of; his breaking "off in weeping and silence when he spoke of "his first wife. Some took it for a true defect "in his memory; others, and for the most part, "for a notable part of his rhetoric; some, that "true grief, and remorse at that remembrance, "had stopt his mouth; for they fay that his first "lady, the Earl of Clare's sister, being with "child, and finding one of his whore's letters, "brought it to him, and chiding him therefore, "he struck her on the breast, whereof shortly « she died."

Principal Baillie's account of the apprehension of Lord Strafford is very curious:—" All things "go here as we could wish. The Lieutenant "of Ireland (Lord Strafford) came but on Mon"day to town, late; on Tuesday rested; and "on Wednesday came to Parliament; but ere "night he was caged. Intolerable pride and "oppression call to Heaven for vengeance. The "Lower House closed their doors; the Speaker "kept the keys till his accusation was con"eluded. Thereafter Mr. Pym went up with a "number at his back to the Higher House, and,

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LORD STRAFFORD. 343"in a pretty short speech, did in the name of the "Commons of all England accuse Thomas Lord "Strafford of high treason, and required his "person to be arrested till probation might be "made: so Mr. Pym and his back were removed. "The Lords began to consult on that strange "and unpremeditated motion. The word goes "in haste to the Lord Lieutenant, where he * was with the King: with speed he comes to "the House of Peers, and calls rudely at the "door. James Maxwell, Keeper of the Black "Rod, opens. His Lordship, with a proud "glooming countenance, makes towards his "place at the board head, but at once many "bid him void the House. So he is forced in "confusion to go to the door till he is called. "After consultation he stands, but is told to "kneel, and on his knees to hear the sentence. "Being on his knees, he is delivered to the "Black Rod to be prisoner till he is cleared of "the crimes he is charged with. He offered to "speak, but was commanded to be gone with"out a word. In the outer room, James Max"well required of him, as prisoner, to deliver "him his sword. When he had got it, with a "loud voice he told his man to carry the Lord "Lieutenant's sword. This done, he makes "through a number of people towards his "coach, all gazing, no man capping to him, z 4 "before

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