A Student's History of England: From the Earliest Times to the Death of King Edward VII, Volume 1

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1910 - Great Britain - 1051 pages
 

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Contents

Religion of the Britons 1o 27 Want of National Feeling
22
Continuance of the Persecu 25 War with France and
23
Britain after the Departure
26
Chaucer and the Clergy 271 14 Alehouses 27 4
27
The Execution of Laud
36
The English Missionaries
49
3
57
page
61
CHAPTER V
67
CHAPTER VI
78
Io Cnuts Empire
84
The Colony of
90
OConnells Election
90
Conquest 10661067 1or 8 Pope Gregory VII
108
quest
114
William II and his Bro 1 ICO
122
Growth of Trade 127 15 Anarchy 1139
129
HENRY 1 11oo1135 stEPHEN 11351154
131
Invasion of Robert Iror 124 5 Henry and Anselm 11oo
140
Archbishop Thomas 1162 142 Thomas 117o
151
The Third Crusade 1189
161
1991216
172
England under an Inter John 1216
178
CHAPTER XIII
185
Monks and Friars IQ I 16 The Provisions of Oxford
192
The Queens Disappoint 1558 427
195
Pace
201
CHAPTER XIV
208
The Scottish Succession
214
The Resistance of Arch
220
CHAPTER XV
231
Chivalry and
235
The Tactics of C 1346
241
Constitutional Progress
243
CHAPTER XVI
254
13601377
260
CHAPTER XVII
266
Io Chaucer and the Clergy
271
Ršads and Bridges 272 15 Wanderers
274
CHAPTER XVIII
278
Richards Growing Unpopu 10 Richards Coup dEtat 1397
282
1066
288
PART IV
289
Death of Richard II 14oo 291 8 The Capture of the Scottish
295
Henry Prince of Wales
297
The Battle of Agincourt
302
COAVTEAV7S
305
Bedfords Success in France 11 The Duke of York in France
308
CHAPTER XXI
320
Rivalry of York and Somer 1460
327
Edward IV and the House
329
The Rebellion of the 11 Henry Prince of Wales
333
The Invasion of France
336
CHAPTER XXIII
343
Cardinal Mortons Fork
349
Continental Troubles II
363
The Contest for the Empire
369
The Royal Prerogative
386
CHAPTER XXVI
392
Henry VIII
404
The Last Days of Henry
410
The Fall of Somerset
416
CHAPTER XXVIII
428
Elizabeths Difficulties 12 End of the Council
436
CHAPTER XXIX
442
Francis Drakes Voyage to 1580
448
Babingtons Plot and
457
The Singeing of the King the Court of High Com
468
Philip II and France 20 ONeill and the Earl
475
PART VI
481
Financial Reform 1619
492
CHAPTER XXXII
502
The Petition of Right 1628 508 16291633
509
CHAPTER XXXIII
520
Scottish Episcopacy 1572
524
CHAPTER XXXIV
532
Royalist Successes 1643
538
Ecclesiastical Debates 1660 583 16641665
590
CHAPTER XXXVIII
596
The Stop of the Exchequer Dismissal 1673
603
The NonResistance Bill 14 Shaftesbury and the King
611
Tory Reaction 1681 622 11 Execution of Algernon
623
pace
631
Breach between Parliament 16 Resistance of the Clergy
638
PART VIII
649
652 Landen 16921603
658
The Peace of Ryswick 1697 667 16 The Act of Settlement
669
Breakup of the Whig Junto 19 The Kentish Petition 17or
675
The Campaign of Blenheim 19 The Sacheverell Trial 1710
691
CHAPTER XLV
702
The Whig Schism 1716 21 Breach between Walpole
720
CHAPTER XLVI
726
Impending War 1738 i 11 Carteret and the Family
737
PART IX
745
The Regulating Act and its 19 Trial of Warren Hastings
763
CHAPTER XLVIII
765
CHAPTER XLIX
777
French Assistance to America 1781
786
CHAPTER L
799
War with the Mahrattas and 21 Thanksgiving at St Pauls
803
Io Restoration of Peace 1781 23 Improvements in Agriculture
813
PART X
819
Louis XVI 17721789 821 12 Breakdown of Pitts Policy
825
CHAPTER LII
831
The Napoleonic Empire
849
Clarkson and the Slave 16 Reaction in England 1792
855
Napoleon and Spain 1807
862
wellingtons Advance 1811
869
CHAPTER LV
875
Queen Caroline 1820
881
PART XI
891
Death of George Iv 1836
898
CHAPTER LVII
909
17
915
CHAPTER LVIII
926
Peels New Ministry 1841 926 15 Irish Emigration 1847
933
CHAPTER LIX
939
The Hampton Court Con 8 The Great Contract It
940
Dickens Thackeray and 14 Winter in the Crimea 1854
946
zo Russia and Afghanistan
949
James and the House of 9 Bacon and Somerset 1612
955
Page
959
907
967
The Second Gladstone Minis
970
CHAPTER LXII
979
Foreign Policy Second
985
685
1000
i
1001
918
1002
A Tory Parliament 1685 636 6 The Violation of the Test
1006
178
1008
261
1009
386
1010
920
1013
222
1014
722
1016
262
1019
402
1020
124
1021
75
1022
181
1023
229
1024
627
1025
SI4
1026
269
1027
885
1028
96
1030
632
1032
739
1035
843
1036
283
1039
689
1042
638
1045
848
1047

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Page 515 - So dear to Heaven is saintly chastity That, when a soul is found sincerely so, A thousand liveried angels lackey her, Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt...
Page 416 - THE body of our Lord Jesus Christ, which was given for thee, preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life ! Take and eat this in remembrance that Christ died for thee ; and feed on him in thy heart by faith with thanksgiving.
Page 570 - Lord, though I am a miserable and wretched creature, I am in Covenant with Thee through grace. And I may, I will, come to Thee, for Thy people. Thou hast made me, though very unworthy, a mean instrument to do them some good, and Thee service...
Page 532 - May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me...
Page 366 - I, your sheep that were wont to be so meek and tame and so small eaters, now, as I hear say, be become so great devourers and so wild, that they eat up and . „ swallow down the very men themselves. They consume, destroy, and devour whole fields, houses, and cities.
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Page 451 - ... ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness, as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 478 - Scottish presbytery, which, saith he, as well agreeth with a monarchy as God and the Devil. Then Jack and Tom and Will and Dick shall meet, and at their pleasures censure me and my Council and all our proceedings. Then Will shall stand up and say, 'It must be thus'; then Dick shall reply and say, 'Nay, marry, but we will have it thus.

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