Beauties of Cowper. To which are prefixed, a life of the author and observations on his writings

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Page 227 - And thus unto the youth she said, that drove them to the Bell, "This shall be yours when you bring back my husband safe and well." The youth did ride, and soon did meet John coming back amain — Whom in a trice he tried to stop, by catching at his rein; But not performing what he meant, and gladly would have done, The frighted steed he frighted more, and made him faster run. Away went Gilpin, and away went post-boy at his heels, The post-boy's horse right glad to miss the lumbering of the wheels.
Page 54 - Happy the man, who sees a God employ'd In all the good and ill that chequer life ! Resolving all events, with their effects And manifold results, into the will And arbitration wise of the Supreme. Did not His eye rule all things, and intend The least of our concerns, (since from the least The greatest oft originate,) could chance Find place in his dominion, or dispose One lawless particle to thwart His plan, Then God might be surprised, and unforeseen Contingence might alarm him, and disturb The...
Page 105 - I AM monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute ; From the centre all round to the sea I am lord of the fowl and the brute.
Page 166 - I would not trust my heart : the dear delight Seems so to be desired, perhaps I might. But no ; what here we call our life is such, So little to be loved, and thou so much, That I should ill requite thee to constrain Thy unbound spirit into bonds again.
Page 225 - My head is twice as big as yours, They therefore needs must fit. But let me scrape the dirt away That hangs upon your face ; And stop and eat, for well you may Be in a hungry case.
Page 51 - There is no flesh in man's obdurate heart, It does not feel for man ; the natural bond Of brotherhood is sever'd as the flax That falls asunder at the touch of fire.
Page 106 - Religion! what treasure untold Resides in that heavenly word! More precious than silver and gold, Or all that this earth can afford.
Page 167 - That thought is joy, arrive what may to me. My boast is not, that I deduce my birth From loins enthroned, and rulers of the earth; But higher far my proud pretensions rise — The son of parents passed into the skies.
Page 14 - As with the diamond on his lily hand, And play his brilliant parts before my eyes, When I am hungry for the bread of life ? He mocks his Maker, prostitutes and shames His noble office, and, instead of truth, Displaying his own beauty, starves his flock ! Therefore, avaunt all attitude, and stare, And start theatric, practised at the glass ! I seek divine simplicity in him Who handles things divine ; and all besides, Though learn'd with labour, and though much admired By curious eyes and judgments...
Page 121 - tis the twanging horn o'er yonder bridge, That with its wearisome but needful length Bestrides the wintry flood, in which the moon Sees her unwrinkled face reflected bright...

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