The rambler

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Page 206 - We frequently fall into error and folly, not because the true principles of action are not known, but because for a time they are not remembered ; and he may therefore be justly numbered among the benefactors of mankind, who contracts the great rules of life into short sentences, that may be easily impressed on the memory, and taught by frequent recollection to recur habitually to the mind.
Page 20 - And, when I die, be sure you let me know Great Homer died three thousand years ago. Why did I write? what sin to me unknown Dipp'd me in ink, my parents', or my own?
Page 227 - ... what are the appearances that thus powerfully excite his risibility, he will find among them neither poverty nor disease, nor any involuntary or painful defect. The disposition to derision and insult...
Page 397 - I shall never envy the honours which wit and learning obtain in any other cause, if I can be numbered among the writers who have given ardour to virtue, and confidence to truth.
Page 359 - It is the great privilege of poverty to be happy unenvied, to be healthful without physic, and secure without a guard ; to obtain from the bounty of nature what the great and wealthy are compelled to procure by the help of artists and attendants, of flatterers and spies.
Page 100 - Of two heroes acting in confederacy agatnft a common enemy, the virtues or dangers will give little emotion, becaufe each claims our concern with the fame right, and the heart lies at reft between equal motives. It ought to be the firft endeavour of a writer to...
Page 396 - The essays professedly serious, if I have been able to execute my own intentions, will be found exactly conformable to the precepts of Christianity, without any accommodation to the licentiousness and levity of the present age.
Page 1 - Whoever shall review his life, will generally find, that the whole tenor of his conduct has been determined by some accident of no apparent moment, or by a combination of inconsiderable circumstances, acting when his imagination was unoccupied, and his judgment unsettled ; and that his principles and actions have taken their colour from some secret infusion, mingled without design in the current of his ideas.
Page 98 - Is it not certain that the tragic and comic affections have been moved alternately, with equal force, and that no plays have oftener filled the eye with tears, and the breast with palpitation, than those which are variegated with interludes of mirth ? I do not however think it safe to judge of works of genius, merely by the event.
Page 166 - Come, thick night ! And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes ; Nor heav'n peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, hold...

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