Proverbial Philosophy: A Book of Thoughts and Arguments, Originally Treated

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C. H. Peirce, 1848 - English poetry - 282 pages
 

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Page 273 - And immediately I was in the spirit; and behold, a throne was set in heaven, and one sat on the throne ; and he that sat was to look upon like a jasper and a sardine stone ; and there was a rainbow round about the throne, in sight like unto an emerald.
Page 271 - Behold, my servant shall deal prudently, he shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high. As many were astonied at thee, (his visage was so marred more than any man, and his form more than the sons of men...
Page 67 - A spark is a molecule of matter, yet may it kindle the world : Vast is the mighty ocean, but drops have made it vast. Despise not thou a small thing, either for evil or for good ; For a look may work thy ruin, or a word create thy wealth : The walking this way or that, the casual stopping or hastening, Hath saved life, and destroyed it, hath cast down and built up fortunes. Commit thy trifles unto God, for to him is nothing trivial ; And it is but the littleness of man that seeth no greatness in...
Page 115 - LOVE : — what a volume in a word, an ocean in a tear, A seventh heaven in a glance, a whirlwind in a sigh, The lightning in a touch, a millennium in a moment, What concentrated joy or woe in blest or blighted love ! For it is that native poetry springing up indigenous to Mind, The heart's own country music thrilling all its chords, The story without an end that angels throng to hear, The word, the king of words, carved on Jehovah's heart...
Page 116 - If thou art to have a wife of thy youth, she is now living on the earth ; Therefore think of her, and pray for her weal ; yea, though thou hast not seen her.
Page 115 - And estimate the recklessness of license as the right attribute of liberty, — But with the world, thou friend and scholar, stain not this pure name ; Nor suffer the majesty of Love to be likened to the meanness of desire : For Love is no more such, than seraphs' hymns are discord, And such is no more Love, than !•'.! ua's breath is summer.
Page 277 - Egyptians ; one displaced from its pedestal by enormous roots ; another locked in the close embrace of branches of trees, and almost lifted out of the earth ; another hurled to the ground, and bound down by huge vines and creepers; and one standing, with its altar before it, in a grove of trees which grew around it, seemingly to shade and shroud it as a sacred thing ; in the solemn stillness of the woods, it seemed a divinity mourning over a fallen people.
Page 270 - Latini, et quo quemque modo fugiatque feratque laborem. sunt geminae Somni portae, quarum altera fertur cornea, qua veris facilis datur exitus umbris, altera candenti perfecta nitens elephanto, sed falsa ad caelum mittunt insomnia Manes.
Page 272 - Thus saith the Lord of Hosts, the God of Israel ; Because ye have obeyed the commandment of Jonadab your father, and kept all his precepts, and done according unto all that he hath commanded you: therefore thus saith the Lord of Hosts, the God of Israel; Jonadab the son of Rechab shall not want a man to stand before me for ever.
Page 66 - And no swerving from a right line, that may not lead eternally astray. A landmark tree was once a seed ; and the dust in the balance maketh a difference ; And the cairn is heaped high by each one flinging a pebble ; The dangerous bar in the harbor's mouth is only grains of sand •, And the shoal that hath wrecked a navy is the work of a colony of worms : Yea, and a despicable gnat may madden the mighty elephant...

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