Sir Isaac Newton's Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy and His System of the World, Volume 2

Front Cover
University of California Press, Jan 1, 1962 - Science - 680 pages
I consider philosophy rather than arts and write not concerning manual but natural powers, and consider chiefly those things which relate to gravity, levity, elastic force, the resistance of fluids, and the like forces, whether attractive or impulsive; and therefore I offer this work as the mathematical principles of philosophy.In the third book I give an example of this in the explication of the System of the World. I derive from celestial phenomena the forces of gravity with which bodies tend to the sun and other planets.
 

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Contents

Section 1
397
Section 2
398
Section 3
400
Section 4
401
Section 5
406
Section 6
442
Section 7
450
Section 8
453
Section 12
465
Section 13
467
Section 14
468
Section 15
505
Section 16
509
Section 17
543
Section 18
549
Section 19
551

Section 9
460
Section 10
462
Section 11
464
Section 20
623
Section 21
627
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