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DICTIONARY

OR

PRACTICAL MEDICINE:

COMPRISING

GENERAL PATHOLOGY,

THE NATURE AND TREATMENT OF DISEASES, MORBID STRUCTURES,
AND THE DISORDERS ESPECIALLY INCIDENTAL TO CLIMATES, TO THE SEX,

AND TO THE DIFFERENT EPOCHS OF LIFE;

WITH

NUMEROUS PRESCRIPTIONS FOR THE MEDICINES RECOMMENDED,
A CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES ACCORDING TO PATHOLOGICAL PRIN-

CIPLES, A COPIOUS BIBLIOGRAPHY, WITH REFERENCES;

AND AN

Appendix of Approved Formulae :

THE WHOLE FORMING A LIBRARY OF PATHOLOGY AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE,

AND A DIGEST OF MEDICAL LITERATURE.

BY JAMES COPLAND, M.D.,

Consulting Physician to Queen Charlotte's Lying-in Hospital ; Senior Physician to the Royal Infirmary
for Diseases of Children; Member of the Royal College of Physicians, London ; Member

of the Medical and Chirurgical Societies of London and Berlin, etc.

EDITED, WITH ADDITIONS,
BY CHARLES A. LEE, M.D.

VOL. VII.

NEW-YORK:

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

82 OLIFF STREET.

1852.

BOSTON MEDICAL LIBRARY

W THE
FRANCIS A. COUNTWAY

LIBRARY OF MEDICINE

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846, by

HARPER & BROTHERS, In the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New York

CONTENTS.

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POISONS-continued.

** | PUSTULAR ERUPTIONS · · · 611

Irritating and Depressing -

• 433

PUSTULE, MALIGNANT-Definition-

Irritant and Alterant -

.447

Causes -

Narcotic .

.612

.

. 460

- -

Treatment .

.614

Narcotico Acrid

. 474

-

Septic

- 615

Bibliography and References

. -

Classification of and Index to - 482 PYLORUS . . . . . · 615

Bibliography and References

PYROSIS-Definition-Symptoms - . 615

POLLUTION-Definition

485

Diagnosis-Prognosis . . • 616

Voluntary

485

Treatment -

- 617

Involuntary .

488

1. Bibliography and References , · 618

Treatment of .

. 489

Bibliography and References - . 497 QUARTAN FEVER , . . - 618

POMPHOLYX . . . . . 497 QUINSY. . . . . . - 618

PORRIGO . . . . . . 497 QUOTIDIAN FEVER . . . . 618

PREGNANCY—Pathology and Therapeu RABIES - - -

tics of - -

- 497 Definition-History-Description . 619

Disorders incidental to .

498

Symptoms

- 620

Influence upon other Diseases.

- 505

Diagnosis -

- 625

Bibliography and References - - 506

Cause

- - - - 627

PROSTATE GLAND-Diseases of

Pathology -

. 630

Bibliography and References - . 512

Treatment

ment :. . . . . . 633

Bibliography and References .. - 640

PRURIGO_Definition - - - . 512

Pathology, Diagnosis, Causes - . 512

RECTUM AND ANUS—Diseases of 642

Treatment - - - - - 514

Malformation-Foreign Bodies - .643

Bibliography and References - - 515

Paralysis of -

- 645

Inflammation of

. 646

PRURITUS_Definition - .

515

Abscess of

• 650

Diagnosis, Treatment, Bibliography - 516 Ulceration of—Fistula in .

• 652

PSOÆ MUSCLES – Inflammation and

Prolapse of

- 655

Suppuration of . - - - 517

Excrescences about .

- 657

Bibliography and References - - 519

Strictures of -

- 658

Cancer of - -

- 661

PSORIASIS AND LEPRIASIS_Causes 519

Bibliography and References - 663

Description of - - - - - 521

Pathology and Treatment of . - 526 RHEUMATISM-Definition

· 663

Bibliography and References - - 531 Acute - - -

. 664

PUERPERALSTATES AND DISEASES 532

Sub-acute-Chronic - .

. 666

Special Seats of

. 669

Pathology of . .

- 532

Gonorrheal .

. 672

Convalescence from -

Complications, Extensions, or Metas-

Prevention of . .

. 540

tasis of . - - - - - 673

Structural Lesions consequent upon - 541

States of the Blood and Excretions in 675

Spasmodic and Nervous Affections - 546

Diagnosis of -

Puerperal Fevers . . . . 548

Causes of - -

678

Treatment of Puerperal Fevers - - 585

Nature of . . . .

680

Bibliography and References - 594

Treatment of Acute. -

683

PULSE-Historical Notices .

- 595 Treatment of Chronic

689

Physiological Pathology of . 596 External Treatment -

693

Semeiological Notices of -

599 Treatment of Complications

696

Bibliography and References

- 603

Bibliography and References - 700

PURPURA-Definition-Pathology . 604 RICKETS–Definition-Description - 702

Description :

- 605 Diagnosis--Prognosis-Causes - - 707

Causes .

. 608 Treatment . - • .. · 709

Treatment

.609 Bibliography and References. .711

Bibliography and References .

.610

ROSE-RASH--Definition-Description - 712

PUS . . . . . . . 610 Treatment

. 714

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RUBEOLA-Definition - .

. 714 Chemical Composition of -

. 776

Description-Nature of . . . 715 Description of -

778
Treatment-Bibliography, etc. - . 716 Pathological Relations of .

- 784
Diagnosis •

• 789

RUMINATION, HUMAN . . . 717

Prognosis • .

. 791

History of -

.718

Treatment .

. 792

Bibliography and References - - 719

Bibliography and References - - 796

RUPIA-Definition-Description of

SCROFULA AND TUBERCLES—Defi-

Diagnosis-Prognosis— Treatment - 721

nition

·

SALIVATION • • • •

• 721 Diathesis described -

798

Causes of -

. 799

SCABIES . . . . .

-

. 721

Structure of .

- 811

SCARLATINA RHEUMATICA-Defini-

Description of ..

. 813

tion -

. 721

Pathology of .

- 817

Description of .

722 Prevention of .

826

Causes of - -

723 Treatment .

- 828

Nature-Treatment .

Bibliography and References . • 837

SCARLET FEVER-Definition

. 725 SCURVY-Definition History of .. - 839

Description of Regular -

- 726

Description - -

• 841

Types and Irregular Forms

. 727

Diagnosis-

- 844

Complications of .

733 Prognosis-Causes of .

. 845

Prominent Affections in ..

735

Nature-Prevention of .

. 850

Sequelæ of - -

. 737 Treatment - - - -

- 854

State of the Blood in

. 741 Bibliography and References - - 856

Appearances after Death

. 742

SEROUS AND SYNOVIAL MEM-

Diagnosis • • •

. 744

BRANES · · ·

. 858

Causes of . .

. 747

Pathological Influences . . . 751

SHOCK, VITAL OR NERVOUS. . 858

Treatment -

. 753

Causes and Phenomena .. - 859

Remarks on Remedies for

.763 Diagnosis and Prognosis - .. . 861

Bibliography and References . *. 767 Treatment - . -

• 862

Bibliography and References -

SCHIRROUS AND OTHER TUMOURS 769

- 863

Elements of - - -

770'SKIN-Functional Alterations

863

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The skin was hot and dry, the pulse frequent, i paralysis, sometimes jaundice, &c. The irrifull, and hard. These symptoms gradually sub- liability of the stomach and cramps, or paralysided, and she recovered, although the pain in sis, often continue long, and are attended by the head and epigastrium continued long. (Lond. costiveness and dysuria or suppression of urine. Med. Gaz., xiv., p. 488.)

465. b. The sub-chloride of copper, oxychlo462. b. The morbid appearances produced by ride or Brunswick green, is sometimes formed the salts of baryta have not been described as when common salt has been used in a copper they occur in man. In the lower animals the vessel, and in this way, as well as when emmucous membrane of the stomach is usually ployed as a pigment, it has given rise to accifound of a deep-red colour, unless death has dental poisoning. A boy of three years swaltaken place very rapidly, and in this case the lowed about a scruple of this salt. Vomiting alimentary canal is healthy. In all the animals and coldness of the extremities followed, and which in Dr. CAMPBELL's experiments were continued until death. On dissection there was killed by the chloride applied to wounds, the no change indicative of the action of an irritant brain and its membranes were much injected poison, excepting slight congestion of the veswith blood; and in one of them the appearan- /sels of the brain. ces were those of congestive apoplexy.

466. c. Copper vessels are acted upon by ar463. c. The Trealment of poisoning by the ticles of food or drink, especially if these artisalts of baryta consists chiefly in the speedy cles contain saline substances or acids, or beadministration of an alkaline or earthy sulphate, come acid while kept in these vessels. Thus as the sulphate of soda or of magnesia. The wines which are more or less acid, substances poison is thus converted into the insoluble sul-containing vinegar, or any other acid, soups or phate of baryta, which, if not altogether inert, broths, especially if they contain vegetable matis nearly so. But the alkaline sulphates are ters, and are liable to become acid, and fatty of but little service where the carbonate of ba- substances, when kept only for a short time in ryta has been taken, unless in procuring the copper utensils, are not infrequently productive more rapid discharge of the poison by the bow of accidental poisoning. Falconer and others els. In Dr. Wilson's case, just mentioned, the have shown that metallic copper undergoes no copious evacuations from the bowels conse- change by contact with water unless air be quent on the exhibition of the sulphates were present, when à hydrated carbonate, mixed evidently beneficial, and tended to the recovery with oxide, is formed. When an acid, or an of the patient. Unless the patient be seen early, I oily or fatty matter, is in contact with the met, any treatment will prove inefficacious. Where al, then this change more rapidly takes place, the carbonate of baryta has been taken, Mr. and the liquid or fat acquires a green hue. TAYLOR recommends recourse to emetics and Hence no acid, oily, or saline liquid should be the stomach-pump; or, as chemical antidotes, I prepared or kept in copper vessels. Nor should a mixture of vinegar with an alkaline sulphate. / fruits, pickles, or preserves be either kept or

464. C. COPPER, THE PREPARATIONS AND Como prepared in them. The quantity of the poison POUNDS of, have been considered above ( 205, which may be formed in these circumstances et seq.) with reference to the corrosive and acute may not be sufficient to produce fatal poisonaction of these substances when administered ing, but they may be quite enough to cause in large doses or quantities. But in smaller severe gastro-nervous or acro-sedative effects quantities, or in repeated doses, they act local Gmelin was consulted respecting a violent disly as irritants of the gastro-intestinal villous ease which prevailed among a whole brothersurface, and constitutionally as sedatives or hood of monks. The symptoms were obstinate paralyzers of nervous and vital power; this and severe colic, retching and bilious vomiting, latter effect resulting both from the influence flatus, costiveness, burning pain in the pit of the primarily produced by them upon the nervous stomach, under the sternum, in the region of systems, and from their operation, through the the kidneys and extremities, with paralytic medium of the circulation, upon the heart and weakness of the arms. He found, on inquiry, nervous centres. The cupreous compounds are that all the kitchen vessels—the pots, pans, most likely to act in this way, and in a chronic milk pail, and butter dishes were made of copform, when they contaminate articles of food, per. Similar instances of culinary poisoning as remarked on many occasions. The salts of have been mentioned by CHRISTISON and other copper, which are the most frequently adminis- writers. tered in large doses for the purposes of suicide 467. d. It is stated by Mr. TAYLOR, that the and murder, are the sulphate and subacetate, and use of the alloy called German silver, which is these act chiefly as corrosive acute poisons, as a sort of white brass, consisting of copper, zinc, stated above ($ 205). But these, as well as the and nickel, and containing about 50 per cent. of other compounds of this metal, may be so em- copper, may be productive of acro-sedative poiployed or administered as to produce the symp- soning where articles, as spoons, made of this toms most characteristic of acro-sedative poison- alloy, are allowed to remain in contact with ing.-a. In most instances the gastric symp- acid, oily, fatty, or saline substances. A lady toms are similar to, but not so severe as, those in Paris, in 1838, after having had eels for din. attending the corrosive operation of the poison, ner, was awakened in the night by headache, while the nervous symptoms are of longer du. nausea, followed by vomiting and colic. Her ration. There are generally burning pain in physician ascertained that the eels had been the throat and stomach, anxiety, vomitings, cooked with butter and vinegar in an earthen. acute pains and great swelling of the abdomen, ware vessel ; and he found the spoon, which but no diarrhea, afterward painful and difficult was of German silver, presenting on different deglutition, with swelling of the throat and parts greenish spots. Chemical analysis show. face, oppression of the pulse, salivation and ul-ed that a poisonous salt of copper had been thus ceration of the gums, spasms, convulsions, or produced; and the fact was farther proved by

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