Hansard's Parliamentary Debates

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Page 641 - ... and is hereby enacted and declared to be of the same force and effect, to all intents and purposes, in all courts of justice, and other places, where by law an oath is or shall be allowed, authorized, directed or required, as if such Quaker had taken an oath in the usual form...
Page 233 - Ireland, as the case may be, of the member to whose election the petition relates, unless it question the return or election upon an allegation of corrupt practices, and specifically alleges a payment of money or other reward to have been made by any member, or on his account, or with his privity, since the time of such return, in pursuance or in furtherance of such corrupt practices, in which case the petition may be presented at any time within twenty-eight days after the date of such payment :...
Page 793 - Holy and Indivisible Trinity, " Their majesties, the emperor of Austria, the king of Prussia, and the emperor of Russia...
Page 641 - deans, prebendaries, parsons, vicars, and others having spiritual promotion," is held not to extend to bishops, though they have spiritual promotion ; deans being the highest persons named, and bishops being of a still higher order.
Page 89 - Gentlemen of the House of Commons ; " I have directed the Estimates for the service of the year to be laid before you ; they will be framed with the most anxious attention to all useful economy.
Page 639 - Berwick-upon-Tweed, who shall be required upon any lawful occasion to take an oath in any case...
Page 775 - That the law of nations is a part of the law of the land, and that, neutral nations, not interposing in the war between his majesty and his enemies, have a legal right to such freedom of commerce and navigation, as is secured to them by the law of nations.
Page 717 - I shall not resort in vain, for assistance in these afflicting circumstances, and that you will be ready to adopt such measures of salutary precaution, and to intrust to me such additional powers, as may be found necessary for controlling and punishing the disturbers of the public peace, and for preserving and strengthening the legislative Union between the two countries...
Page 385 - The King's Government had abstained from all unseemly triumph in the King's Speech respecting the measure of Reform. He (Sir R. Peel) would profit by their example, and would say nothing upon that head, but consider that question as finally and irrevocably disposed of. He was now determined to look forward to the future alone, and considering the Constitution as it existed, to take his stand on main and essential matters...
Page 49 - What hast thou done unto me? I took thee to curse mine enemies, and behold, thou hast blessed them altogether.

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