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Books Books 1 - 10 of 33 on The poet's house was close to the church ; the greatest part of it has been pulled....
" The poet's house was close to the church ; the greatest part of it has been pulled down, and what remains belongs to an adjacent farm. I am informed, that several papers in Milton's own hand were found by the gentleman who was last in possession of the... "
Watlington hill; a poem - Page 47
by Mary Russell Mitford - 1812
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The Monthly review. New and improved ser

1804
...where Mr. J. discovered the origiml scene, described in a most beautiful passage in ifoe L'Allegro. « It must not be omitted that the groves near' this...nightingales, which are so elegantly described in the Peuseroso. Most of the cottage windows are overgrown with sweetbriars, vines, and honey-suckles, and...
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Memoirs of the Life, Writings and Correspondence, of Sir William Jones, Volume 1

John Shore Baron Teignmouth - 1806
...another, who had forgotten the name of Milton, but recollected him by the title of The Poet. It must nqt be omitted, that the groves near this village are...Pensieroso. Most of the cottage windows are overgrown with sweet briars, vines, and honey-suckles ; and that Milton's habitation had the same rustic ornament,...
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The Antijacobin Review: And Protestant Advocate: Or, Monthly ..., Volume 22

1806
...another, who had forgotten the name of Milton, but recollefted him by the title of The Poet. " It mud not be omitted that the groves near this village are famous for nightingales, which are fo elegantly defcribed in the Penfierofo. Mod of the cottage windows are overgrown with fweetbriars,...
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The Works of Sir William Jones: With the Life of the Author, Volume 1

John Shore Baron Teignmouth - 1807
...another, who had forgotten the name of Milton, but recollected him by the title of The Poet. It muft not be omitted, that the groves near this village are famous for nightingales, which are fo elegantly .defcribed in the Penf;ferofo. Moft of the cottage windows are overgrown with fweet briars,...
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Works, Volume 1

Sir William Jones, John Shore Baron Teignmouth - 1807
...another, who had forgotten the name of Milton, but recollected him by the title of The Poet. It muft not be omitted, that the groves near this village are famous for nightingales, which are fo elegantly defcribed in the Penfierofo. Moft of the cottage windows are overgrown with. fweet briars,...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton,: With Notes of Various Authors. To which ...

John Milton, Henry John Todd - 1809
...another who had forgotten the name of Milton, but recollected him by the title of The Poet. " It muft not be omitted, that the groves near this village are famous for nightingales, which are fo elegantly defcribed in the Penferofo. Moil of the cottage windows are overgrown with fweet-briars,...
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Elegant epistles: a copious selection of instructive, moral, and ...

Elegant epistles - 1812
...part of his chamber; and I was much pleased with another, who had forgotten the name of Milton, bat recollected him by the title of The Poet. It must...nightingales, which are so, elegantly described in the Penseroso. Most of the cottage windows are overgrown with sweetbriars, vines, and honey-suckles; and...
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Classical English Letter-writer: Or, Epistolary Selections; Designed to ...

Elizabeth Frank - Letter-writing - 1814 - 368 pages
...partly raised above the groves that surrounded them ; the dark plains and meadows of a grayish colour, where the sheep were feeding at large ; in short,...nightingales, which are so elegantly described in " II Pensieroso." Most of the cottage windows are overgrown with sweet-briars, vines, and honey-suckles...
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Classical English letter-writer: or, Epistolary selections designed to ...

Frank Elizabeth - 1814
...Milton's own hand, were found by the gentleman who was last in possession of the estate. The tra» dition of his having lived there is current among the villagers:...nightingales, which are so elegantly described in " II Pensieroso." Most of the cottage windows are overgrown with sweet-briars, vines, and honey-suckles;...
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The Poetical Register, and Repository of Fugitive Poetry ..., Volume 8

English poetry - 1814
...estate. The tradition of his having lived there is current among the villagers: one of them shewed us a ruinous wall that made part of his chamber; and...windows are overgrown with sweetbriars, vines, and honey- suckl es ; and that Milton's habitation had the same rustic ornament, we may conclude from his...
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