Shifting the Scene: Shakespeare in European Culture

Front Cover
Ladina Bezzola Lambert, Balz Engler
University of Delaware Press, 2004 - Drama - 308 pages
The title of this collection, Shifting the Scene, adapts words from one of the Choruses in Henry V. Its essays try, without denying authority to the text and the theatre, to widen the scene of inquiry to include other institutions, like education, politics, language, and the arts, and to juxtapose the constructions of Shakespeare and his works that have been produced by them. However, as in Henry V, there is also a geographical dimension. The collection goes beyond England and the English-speaking world and focuses on Europe (including Britain). It brings together 17 essays by leading authorities and promising young scholars in the field
 

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Contents

Introduction
11
Staging Europe in Shakespeare
21
Shakespeare and the European Canon
41
The Debate over a Royal Translation of Hamlet
67
The Politics of Language
78
The CloudScene in Hamlet as a Hungarian Parable
95
Millennium British Shakespeares Amateur and Professional in the New Century
113
John Crankos Romeo and Juliet Venice 1958
129
Shakespeare and Eminescu
182
Shakespeare the Lambs and French Education
193
Indoctrination or Creativity?
205
Sexual Morality and Critical Traditions
219
Kozintsevs Social Translation
230
The Shakespearean Sound in Translation
239
Translation and Performance
258
Bibliography
282

Organic Shakespeare for the Folk
140
Shakespeare in SwissGerman Mundart
152
National Identity and the Teaching of Shakespeare
167
Notes on Contributors
297
Index
302
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